The COVID-19 pandemic brought a wave of violent racism against Asian communities all over the world. IWS members Ngoc, Haewon & Dahye welcome three guests for our third episode of IWS RADIO to discuss this and more… We hear first from Jiye Seong-Yu of Asian Voices Europe about how the group went about dealing with the anti-Asian racism. Then, Esra Karakaya of Karakaya Talks joins the show to discuss how the good immigrant image perpetuates the colonial strategy to divide and conquer – and the need for solidarity among migrant communities. And, finally, Thao Ho talks about her collective DAMN (Deutsch Asiat*innen Make Noise) and what it will take to move towards more Black-Asian solidarity.

You can find IWS RADIO on the following platforms... Apple PodcastsCastbox,  CastroDeezer,  Google Podcasts,  iHeartRadioOvercastPlayerFM,  Podcast AddictPodcast Republic,  Podchaser,  RadioPublic,  SoundCloudSpotify,  Stitcher,  TuneIn...


Photos


Transcript & translation

[IWS RADIO INTRO]

DAHYE
Hello everybody. Today’s topic is Racism against Asians – the good immigrant image and COVID-19. This is our third show and today we will first be speaking with Esra Nayeon Karakaya, also called as Ms Blackrock, host of the YouTube shows Karakaya Talk and BlackRockTalk, about the good immigrant image projected onto Asians as a way to control and divide the migrant society. In the second part of the show, we will hear from Jiye Seong-Yu from Asian Voices Europe about how this group dealt with the heightened racism against Asians, especially during the COVID-19 time. We will also listen to Thao discussing DAMN* (Deutsch Asiat*innen Make Noise) as an empowering platform for people of Asian descent in Germany.

HEAWON
Hello, my name is Heawon Chae.

DAHYE
Hi my name is Dahye.

HEAWON
We will co-host today’s radio and our colleague, Ngoc, will be joining us as well from America.

DAHYE
“I’m not a virus” – What images come to your mind? It was so natural: Asians were treated as a virus during the corona situation, we were a virus, people stared at us, refrained from sitting near us, and attacked us verbally and physically. Anyone who “looked” Asian was treated as a detrimental virus. During this time, I felt my existence was torn apart. I stopped going to the supermarket for some weeks as I did not want to feel rejected just because of my appearance. Kids called me “corona”, which made me very angry but also very sad to see how the adults made this world full of hatred and racism.

HEAWON
I totally understand how you felt. Everyone believes that Asian people spread the virus because many media outlets framed the story as: virus = Asian. For example, the newspaper Abendzeitung München depicted COVID-19 as a dangerous lung disease with a picture of an Asian woman with a mask. Another newspaper, the Bild, featured an article called ‘How the coronavirus came to us’ with a picture of five Asian people at the dining table last winter. Last April, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung reported “Liveblog on corona virus” with a picture of Asian children wearing masks. Most offensive of all, German news magazine Der SPIEGEL! features on the cover of the February issue a man wearing a red hoodie, protective masks, goggles and headphones, with a huge headline “Coronavirus Made in China.” This way of reporting not only raises panic and mutual blaming, but also, as we saw, racial discrimination.

Korientation e.V, a self-organized network that focuses on self-representation of Asian Germans in culture and media, created a Corona-racism section with news articles related to racism during Corona and wrote articles discussing the structural racism behind this. For those who want to check it out, visit www.korientation.de.

[IWS RADIO JINGLE]

DAHYE
Wow, So much happened during a short amount of time! I mean it makes no sense to view Asians as a virus, but that happened so easily.

HEAWON
Seriously. It was so easy to target Asians. Many collectives reacted to the racism against Asians in the corona-situation all over the world, including in Berlin.

DAHYE
I heard there is a group which collected and is collecting experiences to make statistical evidence, or?

HEAWON
Yes Asian Voices Europe is working on it. Asian Voices Europe is a young NGO established in March with the goal of combating anti-Asian racism in Europe. Currently they’re a group of 13 human rights activists, academics, journalists, designers, product managers, and translators. This group has been taking action to uphold the human rights of Asians and Asian diaspora who have been experiencing inflamed racist incidents in the recent months in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic. Let us hear the interview with activist Jiye from this group for further information. As Jiye is in Holland and we are in Berlin, we agreed to send her our questions and she answered them through audio messages.

Could you tell us about the process of how you formed Asian Voices Europe organization in the Netherlands with your introduction?

JIYE
Hi, my name is Jiye and I am the founder and president of Asian Voices Europe, which is a non-profit based in the Netherlands and which aims to combat anti-Asian racism. We came to start this organization, because… well, I came to start the initiative back in February, back in March when I experienced a racist incident myself – as we say: the personal is political! My curiosity and my feeling of feeling unsafe in the Netherlands really made me start something that became much bigger than I have ever expected it to become. At the end of February on a Monday, I was biking back home from my dance class – I know it was a Monday because I had classes on Mondays – and two people on a scooter yelled Chinese at me and tried to punch me. So, when this happened it was dark, there was nobody else on the streets. So, what I did was I biked home very quickly. While I was biking back home it really angered me because that same morning I had read on the Dutch news that a 24-year-old Chinese-Dutch woman, student called Sindi, had been attacked in an elevator and this happened because she asked people in the elevator to stop singing the Corona-song, which is a Dutch song that was populated on the radio and which says, “Prevention is better than the Chinese”. And when she asked people to stop singing this song, they physically assaulted her and one of them even assaulted her with a knife. They have yet to find the assailants.

So, while I was biking back home there was the anger, there was the fear, and when I got home I called the police, I reported the incident and I made an appointment to go to the police station in the next week. But what I also did is, I started a survey on a Google Doc. It was a very simple survey, very spur of the moment. Because not just this incident with me or with Sindi, but the past two or three weeks I had been seeing more and more posts on social media about Asians, and especially Koreans because I am South Korean myself, of how they got in the tram and how people were avoiding them. I had also experienced that once I got into the tram in Den Haag and people ran away from me to the other side of the Tram, but there were much, much more serious incidents and many more incidents, and I wanted to be able to gather them in one place to be able to see what actually was the status quo. So, this survey really launched the whole movement and it was cited in the Dutch report from discriminatie.nl – which is the national federation of anti-discrimination agencies. And since I started the survey, I also started reaching out to people and seeing if there is somebody who wants to do something, I don’t know what it is exactly, but we have to do something about this racism that’s being experienced by Asians and I was very lucky because we now have 10 members, which reached out to me early in March. Almost as soon as I started the survey and on March 14th we had our first group meeting and now we are at the end of July so it’s crazy how fast time is coming and how much we have been able to achieve.

HEAWON
Thank you Jiye. According to the survey, most incidents consist of locals calling out “Coronavirus” often combined with threatening gestures or insulting behaviour like spitting. These incidents have occurred in almost every country in Europe. Please tell us more about this.

JIYE
Asian Voices Europe has just finished analyzing the data from survey 1.0. Survey 1.0 was started by me in February when I came home this Monday and I have started this Google Form trying to gather all the data on what Asians had been experiencing during Corona-times. Now the data has been analyzed by our lead researcher Haebin and team members Ahreum and Seunghye. Out of the results, to summarize, we had around 300 total cases from 117 respondents about half of those consisted of verbal attacks. So verbal attacks consist of people shouting, yelling, saying things like Corona, Chinese, get out of town, etc. This is the most common kind of racism that Asians experience even outside of Corona-times. About 60 of those cases consisted of physical harassment or physical assault. So, this was when people were injured physically – they were pushed or in some cases, people threw stones at Asians. And about 90 cases or 30% of total were microaggressions. These are often difficult to define legally and can not be reported to the police but are very pervasive. So, this could be people glaring at you in public making racial jokes, spitting, doing the split eye motion that is often used to mock Asians, fake coughing and bullying. What I found important was that there was a high number of physical assaults which I had not seen too often in the past. But I could be wrong because there is obviously no complete data on Asian… Anti-Asian racism.

HEAWON
How is your work progressing?

JIYE
To combat those cases of anti-Asian racism we launched a petition in May and that was done on wemove.eu. The petition is still ongoing. This petition was targeting the German federal antidiscrimination agency the Antidiskriminierungsstelle des Bundes and the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance. We asked them to set up a hotline for reporting hate crimes against Asians because such a service is available, for example, in New York City. We actually were very happy to receive a response from the German federal antidiscrimination agency within three days of launching the petition and we had a meeting with them already in June. What happens during the meeting is actually the federal agency does not have the implementation authority to set up such a hotline, neither does the European Commission against racism and Intolerance because they are more advisory parties. So, what they have been doing to help us is to put us in contact with other German Länder – state-level – organizations that may be able to implement such projects as well as other European networks focusing on anti-racism and anti-discrimination initiatives. The petition has currently 1.500 signatures but for now, we consider that the petition has achieved, well, somewhat its goal because it has put us in contact with the German federal agencies.

So, the first step to solving the problem is defining the problem which is what we aim to do through the survey and our next step is, of course, to find solutions to dealing with anti-Asian racism. So, those two projects are ongoing at this moment and we are also recruiting helpers if you are interested. The first project is creating a guide book on dealing with anti-Asian racism in Europe. So, this first project aims at all Asian expats and immigrants living in European countries but particularly we will start out with cases of the Netherlands and in Germany. This is for a very practical reason that we have limited resources as a non-profit that has just launched and the fact that our members are currently spread out in the Netherlands and Germany.

In the guide book projects, we will aim to deal with – for example – of how to deal with racism, how can you report racist incidents, and to whom can you report and what is the process and how can you make it easier, how do you navigate those procedures. As well as, for example, there is not only a way of reporting those incidents to the police but you could also receive emotional and psychological help that is covered by national health care policies, for example, in the Netherlands, there is a service that is called the “Sclachtofferhulp” which is literally translated as “victim help” and it’s a service that is provided in coordination with the police to victims of, for example, sexual assault, physical assaults or other kinds of assaults.

The second part of the guide book will be on explaining racism to Dutch, Germans, and other Europeans, because Asians make up such a small minority of the population in those two countries. In the Netherlands if you look at just East Asians populations, they make up 0,7% of the whole population and in Germany, I think it is something like 3%. So these are very small numbers and it means that there are people who live in Germany and in the Netherlands who have never met an Asian person or ever spoken to an Asian person, and if you do not come into contact with different people, when you hear about problems that only impacts this specific group of people it is very unlikely that you will believe and empathize with those issues. So, our goal is to provide people with the tools to be able to explain in a non-confrontational and peaceful way of explaining how I experience racism and this is what I felt, and this is what I would like.

This guide book project is our first project with an external partner: metooasians e.V. which is an NGO based in Berlin. This NGO was launched with the goal of helping Asian women in Germany who have experienced sexual assault. So, we are very happy to have them as a partner. Our second partner is the Asian Advocacy Platform, which is a website we are building, and this is a platform which aims to provide a clear image of anti-Asian racist incidents using both text and visual data. So, our survey data will be incorporated to demonstrate how in numbers we are experiencing racism as Asians but will also include all the elements such as text and other examples. So, this is a project in progress and we hope to be able to show this to you later this year.

DAHYE
Thank you for taking the time to speak with us, Jiye. Thank you very much for the work from your group, making this world a better place to live in.
Today we have a special guest, Esra Nayeon Karakaya to talk about the image of Asians as a good migrant.

HEAWON
Oh, I am a fan of the Black Rock Talk and Karakaya Talk!! I can’t wait to hear your talk.

DAHYE
Let’s listen to my recorded interview with her.

DAHYE
Can you introduce yourself?

ESRA
Yes. My name is Esra Nayeon Karakaya and I am a journalist and video producer. Within the last two or three years I have been working on my own talk show. It started off as “BlackRock Talk” and then for a while now we were in cooperation with a public broadcasting station and for six months we have been producing under the name “Karakaya Talk”. We are now independent again and we will probably be continuing our work with the talk show as “Karakaya Talks“ with an ‘s’ in the end.

And also I was producing with and for “Datteltäter”. Its a YouTube channel that creates content to empower muslim youth in Germany. So generally whenever I get… whenever people or broadcasting stations approach me – I produce videos that often have a sociopolitical relevance, I would say.

DAHYE
Wow. You are doing a lot (laughs). So how did you come up with the talk shows that you are producing?

ESRA
I think it was about three years ago, in 2017, when I imagined an online space where we could come together and talk about all kinds of stuff. Stuff that I felt like wasn’t represented in mainstream German media. And I wanted to have these conversations with people that I felt were underrepresented in… those people are normally people who are already structurally, institutionally marginalized in Germany. So I remember the very first episode that we created and it was… I think.. I will always remember this moment, inviting five women with hijab to the show and kind of making a statement. Even though we were really, really small, I think it was very important for me to create that, create that space and let everybody know that we are important, just as anybody else in this country or in this world.

DAHYE
Yeah, I really… I was very impressed by this show. It was very emotional somehow for me to see these wonderful women in one shot. Like visualizing their existence and making it very important. And also for the community here to know that these women are here and they can also come to a talk show at once.

ESRA
Definitely.

DAHYE
Which was not represented before.

ESRA
Yeah, which I think is crazy and how… I don’t understand how, it is even possible… I don’t even know how German media has not understood how important it is to represent certain people. And it’s crazy to think that the only time… the first time – I think in German history – where so many women with hijab were represented visually – was a production that is self-made, no funding with a self-made kind of collective. And it’s kind of… it’s nice for us because we were able to create that. But it’s also kind of sad to see that that is the… that that is where Germany is at right now still. To this day.

DAHYE
Yeah. So talking about this, I would like to shift a little bit of our conversation to the Asian focus. As you know, Asians are represented as good migrants, but for me… like it sounds like a compliment, but for me what is behind this expression is quite fishy.

ESRA
Definitely.

DAHYE
It means, like, Asians are submissive, hardworking, diligent. But actually, to be honest, I’m like the laziest person in the world. I’m an Asian but I am not diligent. I’m not hardworking. And also there’s like this picture, other migrants should follow them in order to settle down well in the migrated country. So how do you think about this?

ESRA
So I definitely agree. There is this kind of narrative that, you know, Asians, South Asians are generally the smart ones, the intelligent ones, but most… most of all, the obedient ones. And I think that this narrative is used to kind of divide certain communities or minority communities in Germany, right? As in saying, oh, you, community A, you are so obedient and good, even though we’re not giving you all the access, but we’re giving you compliments, right. So ultimately, I’m looking at community B and I’m like community B, you have failed on all levels and you better, you know, look at community A. And then what happens sometimes – what can happen and did happen and does sometimes happen to this day – is that community B gets angry at community A and then community A is like: Yo, you should be more like us, and community B is like: Shut up, man. Like, you don’t know nothing, you don’t know nothing. Instead of focusing on why this narrative exists and kind of questioning the narrative, the communities… so this concept of… this colonial concept of divide and conquer takes grip and the community start not mobilizing and unifying, but kind of separating each other.

DAHYE
Yeah, I mean, like I always question who are you to set the model minorities? We are the ones who should identify ourselves and we are not homogeneous as an Asian community… Asia is so big, we are individuals, everyone’s super different, but like for them to label us as model minorities… And also it was sad for me to feel like I have to prove my existence all the time. I have to prove that I’m like a good immigrant to stay here, to be accepted by the society that I do not belong to. But actually, everyone should belong to a society they settle in.

ESRA
Definitely. So I have a thought and I… I wonder how you feel about this thought. So because you were not born and raised in Germany obviously you will… you have certain struggles that people… that non German citizens have. You will have to be… you have to be obedient to the system in order to stay. So you’re very dependent on the system, right? So now what if we talk about the… the people that have been raised in Germany and hold the German citizenship?
What I’ve been observing is – and please correct me if I’m wrong, it’s just a feeling – that especially in East Asian communities in Berlin that were… that were raised in Germany, oftentimes they’re… they’re less politicized than, for example, Muslim racialized communities are. And I sometimes… like that is also sometimes… that brings in conflict between these communities. Oftentimes I’m… I get angry, right. Because I am also in this position where I have a Korean mother – so I definitely have the Korean experience – but then I also have a Turkish father. And well, in Germany, I am definitely racialized as a Muslim woman. That is for sure. So oftentimes when I see, when I meet and when I talk to people within the East Asian communities, East Asian German communities, born and raised here or just raised in Germany, I often feel like there is a lack of understanding and solidarity for other communities and sometimes that makes me angry. But I do understand also that that is part of that narrative: Oh, you’re a good immigrant, you know, and you… you are obedient. So we’re not going to get on your nerves too much, right. But I think what I would love to happen is for more East Asian communities to stand up. Understand that we are all in the same boat.

DAHYE
Yeah, I totally agree. I can’t say so much representing the East Asian community because I’ve been living here only like two years and a half. But still, I do find it’s very important for us to have solidarity to each other, to each community. But I do feel sometimes very isolated when I’m in other communities because they find Asians don’t face racism, even though they’re like super critical about racism or human rights, they’re like: oh, you’re Asians, you’re having a comfortable life because no one’s bugging you here.

ESRA
Yeah.

DAHYE
Actually, we are bugged pretty much. And with the current situation, it became very apparent. But even before Asians were going through these racial… structural racism, right.

ESRA
Definitely.

DAHYE
But still, I think you’re also right from the other point of view, like other communities’ point of view, they find East Asian communities are kind of not so critical about what they are going through. But also from the East Asian view, I find, yeah, we also have these kind of difficulties. But other communities do not fully understand what’s going on.

ESRA
Right.

DAHYE
But like, what I really find important is: We are not the ones who should fight against each other…

ESRA
Definitely.

DAHYE
…and like, criticize: Yeah, I have more hardship than you. You have like less hardship than me… I mean, it doesn’t really matter, right. We are all going through this structural racism and that’s happening to every single person, every single body from any community that are non-white, right?

ESRA
That’s right.

DAHYE
So we have to build a block together, show solidarity in order to change this world, to be a better place – that our next generation can have a better life, at least a little bit.

ESRA
True. But I do think – I agree with you, definitely! – but I do think there’s a difference. So one is… ok, one thought that I’m having is – I don’t want to generalize – I think before I’ve been…. it’s a very general observation that I’ve been doing and I don’t think that’s very fair to also all the activists in Berlin and in Germany, the Asian – East Asian and South Asian activists that have been working so hard to kind of raise awareness and politicize their surroundings. So shout out to Vicky and Thao, all the people who have been doing the work for years. And at the same time, yes, you’re right that we are all in this together, but I do think we need understanding of each other. I do think that we need to understand what it means being targeted as or racialized as East Asian. I think it’s important that I also know what it means, being a dark skinned Asian. I think it… just the experience is just so different and I need to know so in order for me to be in proper solidarity. And I also need my… all the people, my surroundings to understand what it means wearing a hijab, what it means being racialized as a Muslim being or racialized as Kanak, right. So I think it’s very, um, yes, we need to stand together but also… and not let this divide happen, at the same time have understanding for the different experiences that we make.

DAHYE
Yeah. I mean, I can’t agree more. And I do think, like, everyone has their different experiences, but we have to share with each other what kind of experience we have. But sometimes I find… also I sometimes do it this way: We become like selective. We are more focused on the experiences we have – like not we I’m sorry – like what these individuals, each of them have. So they start to focus on that. And when they start to focus on it, they go deep inside and then it’s really hard to understand others’ experiences. I’m talking with my experience. When I’m like focused on my hardships, my difficulties, I can’t really look on other sides. But I do think this is very important for us to have a platform to share our narratives so we can make a broader platform that’s like more united because we shouldn’t be divided, right. Like we are all we should be all together. And that’s why we invited you, because we wanted to show through this radio episode that we are all having this problem and we are all together. And that leads to the good migrant image. I’m… I’m having this question, OK, if there’s a good minority or like model minority, then who is the bad immigrant? Who is the good immigrant? This image is posing on everyone – like we’re all influenced by this image. So that’s what’s dividing people, right? Like, as you said, like accusing Muslim communities, like, oh, yeah, if you want to be a good immigrant: You have to, like, follow us. You have to be blah, blah, blah. But actually, the migrant people did not really make this image.

ESRA
Definitely.

DAHYE
It’s by the Colonial conquer, right.

ESRA
For sure.

DAHYE
I wanted to just ask you – how it was to you? Like you also said, you had two steps being viewed as a foreigner and also like being defined as a good and bad immigrant. So how was it to you? Was it difficult for you to overcome it or did you just, like, not care about it?

ESRA
So I think when I was younger, I don’t think… I didn’t think it was an option to overcome it. I felt that… I thought that was just the way it was meant to be. That’s just the way how it works. And it was obvious to me that because I have Turkish heritage that I will not ever be able to get into that function as a pure, so say, Asian category. Which is also interesting, because even though I identify myself as the person that I am and I feel very much like I’m… I have a lot of experiences like we all do, right, that are influenced by our parents or the surroundings, I’m… I have… I feel like growing up, people oftentimes didn’t feel comfortable accepting that I had something Turkish and Korean in me, they would rather be like: Yeah, yeah, that is Turkish – you Turkish, girl – you are Muslim because obviously that gene is just really strong and dominant. It’s just… that’s just the way it is. And, you know, the Korean gene that is very submissive, can’t hold, you know, cannot win against the dominant Turkish… Turkish genes. So you are completely Turkish, right. Which I thought was oftentimes very… it oftentimes stripped me of my Korean identity. Which I didn’t like, which I didn’t understand. I think after a while… when I understood why… why this was happening, I kind of started not liking this. But when I was younger, I didn’t understand, I didn’t understand why people were so eager to see me as a Turkish descendant, rather as Korean-Turkish. Right.
So that was the beginning. And I just accepted the way it was. The categorizations. But then growing up, I think, I started university and I started politicizing myself. I think I was compared to the people in my surroundings, I was rather someone who politicized herself rather late. And I understood: Oh, I understood the narratives. I understand this. I understood the social norms and… That is also when I actively decided to call myself a German out of political reasons. Not because I identified as a German, because out of political reasons. And to this day… I think we all will notice that it’s still very, very common that German-ness is often used as whiteness. So people will be like: Oh, you know, I’m German. In front of me and I’m like, so what if you are German and… but you’re not saying the white. What? What does it make… What am I then? We might have been born in the same hospital, but yet still there’s something in you that feels so natural to not call me a German, right. I do have to say that through… interestingly that… because I started using being German as a political method, I did start feeling that way too. I think that was in my mid 20s. But I would have to say that is something that is so irrelevant to me, because being German… I do understand that I do have a lot of privilege being German, right. It does make a difference living in the Global North and having all of these experiences, all of these privileges that come with a German citizenship. But, in a German context, me being German is…. [slaps her hands].

DAHYE
Yeah.

ESRA
I notice it’s not enough to just have that conversation because it’s something… there is a much bigger problem behind that, you know, the identifying as German or non German. So, yes.

DAHYE
Yeah. Thank you for sharing your experience. I can feel… these people, when they see a BPoC and these people say they’re like a German, then people can’t really accept it because it doesn’t fit to their box. Just one story: I have a friend. We went to the doctor together and he’s a German. He grew up… He’s born and raised in Germany. He has a grandmother and a German father. And then the doctor was saying: Oh, you’re German is so good. Where did you learn it? And then he was like: I’m a German. But she was like: So where did you learn it. It’s really good. I think it’s not only his story, everyone would have experienced this before. So it’s so ridiculous for me. What is so special for a German to speak German fluently, right. It’s their mother tongue, but they just can’t accept it.

ESRA
I swear. I remember university, man. I mean, you could be like, okay, maybe teachers don’t know. But I’m at university! It was professors who were like, “your German is just very good. Very good. Yes. Yes. I think I can work with you.” And I am mind you, because I am dependent on the professor, I’m just like not saying anything but in my head I’m like: Girl, where am I here? I don’t want to go home. What is this place?

DAHYE
No, I wanted to like… make this story open, so people… listeners, who’s listening to the radio, don’t ever ask someone if their German… where they learned their German when they say they are a German person. Right? Even though they are BPoC, they’re German, right. You don’t have to be white

ESRA
And also like… think about the moments when you use the word German.

DAHYE
Yeah.

ESRA
Do you refer to yourself as a German? Who else do you refer to as German? And who do you not refer to as German? I think that also is very important. And also… I mean, that’s very… I think that is like basic, basic, basic, basic common knowledge. Not asking why you speak German so well, not asking where you’re from, not asking what languages to speak, so you can understand… maybe find out where this person might be from. Just chill! Just chill and just start a conversation with that person, get to know the PERSON.

DAHYE
Right.

ESRA
Not the race of the person, get to know the person. And when you feel comfortable and when that person feels comfortable, it will naturally happen, right.

DAHYE
It’s so common knowledge, but it’s not so common, right. It’s sad. It’s sad to know this. And yeah thank you so much! And then like, it’s really… it would have been hard that you have this good immigrant and bad immigrant image, both like colliding in yourself, not by yourself, but by other people projecting on you. But how did you feel during the Corona time? Like Asians are model minorities, but they were so easily targeted with the virus during the COVID situation. How… how did you see this?

ESRA
To me, it was like I told you! It’s only… it’s a lie: This whole model minority thing is a lie. Once something happens, it’s so easy to shoot at or to target Asians, East Asians, Southeast Asians, it doesn’t… It just doesn’t make a difference. So this whole narrative of good communities or bad communities – it’s bullcrap. It’s nothing that is useful. It’s not useful to the communities who are marginalized. So I think, there’s no point in buying into a narrative that says these people are good and the other ones are not. Because that kind of categorization is… it dehumanizes people and rejects them all kinds of access to resources that white Germans have on a daily basis. So I think… kind of questioning these narratives is crucial in 2020. We haven’t done it to 2019, not 2010, we haven’t done in 1990, but now is the time. It’s never too late. Let’s now question these narratives.

DAHYE
Right. I totally agree. I mean, it was painful for me during the Corona time, of course, but I was like, come on, this is a fallacy. There’s no such thing as a model minority. If they really see Asians as a model migrant, then they should learn how successful these Asian countries reacted to the coronavirus situation and apply it to their own country. But they don’t see them as a role model. They’re just planting the role model image – the model minority image – into the migrant society for them to function the whole society better. So it’s more instrumentalized that made me very angry, very sad about how this whole system is working. It’s not new, of course, but we are just tired of knowing it, facing it every moment. And this was… this became so apparent that this is a lie.

ESRA
Yeah. Pretty much.

DAHYE
We define ourselves, not you. Yeah, that was great. So to make another question: What motivates you to push forward your action and your work these days?

ESRA
That’s a good question, because I sometimes wonder why I do the things that I’m doing. (laughs) It’s so much work. It’s a lot of… it’s not just time consuming, but it’s energy consuming and understanding that… just using… investing so much time into something where you get back so little. Because I’m investing into a society, right. I’m investing into a better future. But in return… what I’m getting back.. it doesn’t match what I’m giving, right. So it does take me a lot of… I need certain things in my life to… to remind me why I do these things in the first place. And… You know, I’m not… I don’t even know at this point in my life! I would love to be like, oh, you know, it’s so important to keep on going, blah, blah. But at this point in my life right now, I am sick and tired. I am sick and tired! I don’t even know why I’m… why I’m doing all of this work. And that is partly also the reason why I think about or plan to go more into entertainment instead of doing socio political content because at the end of the day, once I put out stuff, there is… there is massive feedback that is good, but also terrible. And I mean, feedback is important. But sometimes what do you… what did you… what do you do with toxic feedback? Right. And I’m the only one to shoulder that toxic feedback. So I’m kind of wondering… I want to keep going because I know what’s important, because I know I will find my way and I will find a… a solution to the situation that I’m in right now. But my goal is to make… make Germany understand that it’s crucial to represent all people, all peoples. And it’s important that… To know that we have a responsibility towards the weakest in the system, the most vulnerable in the system, and that is our responsibility. It’s not a choice. It’s not an option. It’s a responsibility. And I’m also taking… I’m also holding myself accountable, because even though I do know that I experience certain kinds of marginalization in Germany, structurally and institutionally, individually too obviously, I also know that on different levels I am privileged and I have to understand that I need to use these privileges and my responsibilities in order to do good.

DAHYE
Thank you for being honest. I think it’s so natural: You can be sick and tired because it’s not easy, right. But I have to tell you, you’re empowering so many people with your own existence and how you’re like projecting yourself, being so courageous to go in front of the camera and telling people, I exist here, we exist here, you exist here. We’re all valuable people. No matter where you come from, no matter what kind of background you have, you’re just… you are an important person and your narrative is valuable and worth to be heard. So I think it’s really important what you’re doing.

ESRA
Thank you.

DAHYE
And I’m very thankful for you to produce so great programs and giving so much inspiration to people and empowerment to people. I think you’re a wonderful woman! I’m so happy about it. And I’m very proud of you, that you’re my friend. (laughs) Yeah, so at the end, maybe I would like to say people listening, they should keep an eye on the next Karakaya Talks. With the s in the end.

ESRA
Yes.

DAHYE
And follow the channel. Subscribe the channel and give lovely comments to Esra.

ESRA
Yes.

DAHYE
So she can push forward. I do think now is the time for you to sort out your soil, make it rest and then seed your plants again and then they will grow again. Give fruits to people as you have done till now.

ESRA
That’s beautifully said.

DAHYE
I’m so thankful for you sharing your experience and your ideas today. It’s great.

ESRA
Thank you so much for having me.

HEAWON
Thank you very much, women. You are listening to IWS RADIO – The Migrant Women Experience and today’s show is called : Racism against Asians – the good immigrant image and COVID-19. After the break, we will hear from Ngoc, who is currently in the United States, speaking in conversation with Thao, a writer and community organizer, on her collective DAMN* (Deutsche Asiat*innen, Make Noise!).

DAHYE
We will now listen to a song from a film, “Magic Zipper”. The director, Suna Lim, was inspired by the story of her friend who grew up in Brazil as a Black person. This rap comes at the end of the film. Tim, the main character, expresses through the rap that he does not need the magic zipper anymore while the magic zipper triggers that he is searching for it.

 

[SONG: MAGIC ZIPPER]

Composed by Yoonji Kim
Lyrics written by Juni Lee, Suna Lim

Zipper
Hey hey Tim!
wer ist die neben dir. deine neue Freundin aus Korea?
die braust du nicht. Du weißt. Du brauchst mich.
Also hör mich mal jetzt zu!!

Hey, hey Tim!
Who is that sitting next to you? Your new friend from Korea?
You don’t need her. You know, you need me.
So listen up now!

Zipper
Ich weiß du suchst immer nach mir, immer nach mir immer nach mir und
Ich weiß sogar, dass du Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst und
Deine Badeente sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch.
Denn ich bin dein Magic Zipper!

I know you are searching for me, searching for me, searching for me and
I know also that you’re smoking Lollipop’s, you’re smoking Lollipop’s, you’re smoking
Lollipop’s and
Your rubber duck is also searching for me, searching for me, searching for me
Because I’m your Magic Zipper!

Tim
Hi ich bin Tim vielleicht kennst du mich und Uwe,
er ist mein bester Freund der von vielen Zügen träumt.
Sue mit ihrer Blumentasse kam aus Korea
wie ein Genie aus einer Lampe wir wussten nicht wo her.
2NE1 sagt “Bag Su Cheo Nado ddaro Chumul Cheo (Übersetzung 2ne1 sagt Clan your
hands und ich tanze auch dazu)
Uwe hört gern “Kung Jja Jja Kung Jjak” und klatscht dabei Jjak Jjak Jjak!

Hi I’m Tim, maybe you know me and Uwe,
he is my best friend who dreams of many trains.
Sue with her flower cup came from Korea
like a Genie out of a Lamp we didn’t know from where.
2NE1 says “Bag Su Cheo Nado Ddara Chumuel Cheo”
Uwe listens to Kung Jja Jja Kung Jjak and claps to it Jjak Jjak Jjak!

Tim
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- bin ich doch selbst
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- Super wie Uwe yeah!

Zipper what do you want, I can search me myself.
You have to be zipped closed I am Magic myself.
Zipper what do you want, I can search me myself.
You have to be zipped closed Magic awesome like Uwe is, yeah.

Tim
Ich weiß nichts über Brasilien
aber alles über Brarups Zuglinien
Lolli’s rauch ich heute auch
ob Erdbeere, Zitrone, sag mir wenn du eine brauchst
Magic Zipper du willst mich verändern
steck mich nicht in eine Box mit viel zu hohen Rändern
Lass mich so bleiben wie ich bin,
mir gefällt es so, MFG Dein TIm

I don’t know anything about Brazil
but everything about Brarups Train lines
I smoke Lollipop’s today too, Strawberry, Lemon let me know if you want one too.
Magic Zipper you want to transform me
don’t put me in a box with high walls around me
Let me be myself as I am
I like it how it is, Best regards your Tim

Tim und Zipper
Ich weiß du suchst immer nach mir, immer nach mir immer nach mir und

Ich weiß sogar, dass du Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst und
Deine Badeente sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch.
Deine Badeente sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch.

Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- bin ich doch selbst
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- Super wie Uwe yeah!
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- bin ich doch selbst
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- Super wie Uwe yeah!

Aha! hey oma! was machst du hier?
kommt der Zug überhaupt mal an?
Ah.. doch ich hab da was gehört..

Aha, hey grandma! What do you do here?
Is a train even coming?
Ah.. I think I heard something..

————————————————–

 

NGOC
Wow I love the rap thanks for sharing it! By the way, hi everyone I’m Ngoc, a member of International Women* Space, and I am currently in the USA. There is a whole lot happening right now in the US, I think especially within the Asian American community I feel like there’s a reckoning taking place around what it means to be racialized Asian and coming to terms with the role that we play in racism and white supremacy. I had a really great conversation with Thao, a writer and organizer based in Berlin about all of this and I’m really excited to share it with you so let’s listen to the conversation shall we?
Thao can you introduce yourself and then also the collective DAMN* that you created?

THAO
Yeah, sure. First of all thank you for reaching out to me and inviting me to talk on the International Women* Space podcast. My name is Thao and I’m a writer and community organizer based in Berlin and I initiated DAMN* which means Deutsche Asiat*innen [German Asians] Make Noise in 2017 and it’s a political platform and activist collective that aims to connect and mobilize the Asian diaspora in Germany. Maybe to introduce DAMN*, I would perhaps start also how I… how I started my activism. My first contact with activism was actually an internship at a women’s shelter about six or seven years ago and due to my own experiences with sexual and domestic violence I realized from very early on that the system does not support everyone equally and usually protects the perpetrator and oppressor so I was very motivated to learn more about how women can seek help and protect themselves. I think this informed the community work I do with them quite a lot because it’s much about self-education, empowerment, and self-organization as self-protection.

NGOC
Thank you that was really powerful and I’m just excited to hear more about how DAMN* and you went about creating this safe and empowering space for people of the Asian diaspora during this pandemic.

THAO
The pandemic started, I think, two weeks after Hanau, right, the terror attack in Hanau. After Hanau specifically, we felt the urge to finally organize ourselves better and establish working groups and actually the first meeting was set on, I don’t know beginning of March, but then everything started to close down and we didn’t know whether we should meet up or not. Then we decided not to meet up offline so we postponed and during the pandemic and the lockdown we decided to just do the meetings online. This was really great actually because people who don’t live in Berlin could also participate in these meetings and this was really powerful because there were also people of East Asian descent who even for the first time experienced racism due to Corona and were not politicized at all but just needed some kind of space where they could talk about it or became interested in becoming more political or active in such community… groups.

So this meeting was a… became a space of people with many different backgrounds and at this event we started to establish working groups and distributed work. For me, it was so much more empowering, like the fact to empower people to do something instead of being a person who talks about anti-Asian racism only, you know, because DAMN* has never been something that tried to represent a group or represent a problem or be the voice of the Asian diaspora. It was more of a space where people can come together and empower each other and then feel empowered to also do something, it was not only about being seen and heard but actually take actions.

NGOC
So now I kind of want to talk about the fact that not only were we seeing racism against Asian people of course during Corona. There were also reports of racism against Black people in Asian countries. DAMN* recently organized a lot of events that were focused as well on taking action to build Black-Asian solidarity and to create space for reflection around what it means for us to be in solidarity. So how were you seeing anti-Blackness within Asian communities and what was the purpose that you saw in creating these events to go about addressing this anti-Blackness?

THAO
This is what I observed in the DAMN* group as well when we discussed it, that sometimes people would say that we could also discuss one racism and it’s either we talk about anti-Asian racism or we talk about anti-Black racism. And there’s often that understanding, ok, that if we only talk about anti-Blackness we kind of ignore our needs as well because I also encounter racism and why does nobody talk about anti-Asian racism and what about pandemic racism and pandemic racism is not only anti-Asian racism right? It’s something that I guess sparked interest a lot in the media, there was a lot of media or relatively quite a few coverage of anti-Asian racism here in Germany and in other European countries. We just have to make it clear that these issues have been side by side, is not either or and this mindset is also quite colonial because you are kind of forced to just concentrate on one, I mean this is also how the media functions too. They cover this topic and then this is what we’re supposed to concentrate on now and then they cover this and then this and then this, but this is not how this should work.
What I also wanted to say was that we definitely need to talk about colorism in our Asian communities. It’s just something very elementary actually. For example, here in Berlin there are a few Asian collectives but usually the emphasis is often on East Asians or Southeast Asians so in order to talk about anti-Blackness in our Asian communities we also have to debunk our own anti-Blackness, of course, and also how we work, it’s not only about talking about these topics and not taking action, we can have thousands of workshops about “let’s talk about colorism”, right? Then even invite someone who is from South Asia, for example, and then have them talk about colorism and then it’s not enough and I have observed that actually, that within our Asian communities we tokenize as well and that’s really problematic so we need to work on that and many other things.

NGOC
What do you envision for Black-Asian solidarity and how do we work towards it in this moment?

THAO
I think DAMN* has always tried to stay practical because… I used to be active in white leftist groups and there was generally a lot of theory but no action and a lot about big concepts but no specifics. So we try, within DAMN* we try to focus on specifics so if we focus on building Black-Asian solidarities it also means to educate our communities about the specifics of anti-Blackness so about oppressive systems, about capitalism and make them aware of what individuals can do. Capitalism, white supremacy, patriarchy, homophobia, all of this that we need to break down and start to understand what it actually means, because if you don’t know what it means and then try to be an ally, it’s just performance because you don’t know your own position in this society and your privilege. We always talk about privileges but we often don’t talk about what we can do with them and how we can help each other also with our own resources. Definitely look into the concept of model minority because I feel this is a huge topic that kind of hinders us to show solidarity, especially because there’s this image of Asian people profiting off of white supremacy and Asians, East Asians, Vietnamese people specifically being the model minority, Migrations- [migration] wonder, whatever, so it is definitely important to speak about model minority in connection to other concepts, for example, capitalism and how this connects. It’s very important to look within our own communities first before we claim to be allies or whatever. To be an ally for me is more about becoming aware of all these structures and realizing, yes, we’re fighting the same fights and we’re here to support each other.

NGOC
Thank you for sharing all of that with us.

[IWS RADIO JINGLE]

DAHYE
Thank you Thao for your great inputs and your great work. I hope many listeners support DAMN*’s important actions!
Now we will listen to a song from a project by DJ Jee, Tsukasa Yajima and Suna Lim called “my little peace statue”. The peace statue is made to remember the history of women drafted as sexual slavery by the Japanese Military during the second world war, also known as “comfort women”, so it will never happen again to the next generation. The statues are installed in many places, but there are also little ones that we can buy and carry around, put it on our desks. The team made a film and photographed the little peace statues traveling around Berlin and being loved by many people.

AG Trostfrauen from Korea Verband organizes many actions, educational programs, and research on the “comfort women” issue. They are currently having a permanent exhibition called “comfort women” and our joint fight against sexual violence in their office in Moabit. This exhibition links structural sexual violence in diverse regions and gives space for visitors to participate in further action. Please visit their website for more information and send an email to mail@koreaverband.de to join their work or visit the exhibition.

So coming back to the my little peace statue project, this song contains names of the victims of the “comfort women” system all over the world with different voices. We would like to #SayTheirNames, who were victims of sexual violence, structural racism, and police violence.

[SONG: MY LITTLE PEACE STATUE ]

HEAWON
Hello again, we are back. We had a great talk today! Dahye, how can listeners learn more if they are interested in getting involved?

DAHYE
There is #Mygration Festival Deutschland, which is hosting many events to share the narratives of people with migrant backgrounds in their own way of expressions. International Women* Space is a cooperation partner of this festival. Due to the current situation, the Festival cannot be hosted in person, so we will have diverse online programs throughout this year. Un.Thai.tled is also a great collective of creatives in Berlin. They organise events to showcase talents from Thailand and in Germany to free themselves from easy labels and stereotypes, to bring the narrative back to their hands.

HEAWON
All right. We are now at the end of our show. Thank you, Esra Nayeon Karakaya, Jiye Seong-Yu, and Thao for sharing your knowledge and perspectives with us and our audience.

DAHYE
Thank you! Woo! Yeah!

DAHYE
Thank you very much everyone and we are looking forward to interacting more with you through IWS RADIO. Please spread this podcast to your friends, family, and comrades!

[IWS RADIO OUTRO]

[IWS RADIO INTRO]

 

DAHYE
Hallo! Unser heutiges Thema ist Rassismus gegen Asiat*innen – das Stereotyp der guten Einwander*innen und COVID 19. Dies ist unsere dritte Sendung. Wir werden heute mit Esra Nayeon Karakaya, auch bekannt als Ms Blackrock und als Moderatorin der YouTube Formate Karakaya Talk and BlackRockTalk darüber sprechen, wie das Stereotyp des guten Einwander*innen auf Asiat*innen projiziert wird um migrantische Communities zu kontrollieren und zu spalten. Im zweiten Teil der Sendung erzählt Jiye Seong-Yu von Asian Voices Europe, wie die Gruppe mit dem verstärkten Rassismus gegen Asiat*innen insbesondere während Covid 19 Zeiten umgegangen ist. Thao erzählt von DAMN* (Deutsch Asiat*innen Make Noise) einer empowernden Plattform für assiatischstämmige Menschen in Deutschland.

 

HEAWON
Hallo, mein Name ist Heawon Chae.

 

DAHYE
Hi mein Name ist Dahye.

 

HEAWON
Wir werden die heutige Sendung gemeinsam moderieren. Unsere Kollegin Ngoc ist aus den USA zugeschaltet.

 

DAHYE
“Ich bin kein Virus” – Welches Bild kommt dir da in den Sinn? Es war ganz alltäglich: Während der Corona Pandemie wurden Asiat*innen wie ein Virus behandelt. Wir waren ein Virus. Menschen starrten uns an, weigerten sich neben uns zu sitzen und attackieren uns verbal und physisch. Jede*r, die*der asiatisch “aussah” wurde wie ein gefährliches Virus behandelt. Während dieser Zeit hatte ich das Gefühl, dass meine Existenz auseinander gerissen wurde. Ich ging einige Wochen lang nicht mehr in den Supermarkt, da ich mich nicht allein wegen meines Aussehens zurückgewiesen fühlen wollte. Kinder nannten mich “Corona”, was mich sehr wütend machte, aber auch sehr traurig – zu sehen, wie die Erwachsenen diese Welt voll mit Hass und Rassismus machten.

 

HEAWON
Ich kann gut verstehen, wie du dich gefühlt hast. Alle glauben, dass Asiat*innen das Virus verbreiten, weil viele Medien die Geschichte als “Virus = asiatisch” dargestellt haben. Zum Beispiel stellte die Abendzeitung München COVID-19 als eine gefährliche Lungenkrankheit dar, und zwar mit dem Bild einer asiatischen Frau mit einer Maske. Eine andere Zeitung, die Bild, veröffentlichte letzten Winter einen Artikel mit dem Titel “Wie das Coronavirus zu uns kam”, mit einem Bild von fünf asiatischen Menschen am Esstisch. Letzten April berichtete die Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung “Liveblog zum Coronavirus” mit einem Bild von asiatischen Kindern mit Maske. Am beleidigendsten von allen, zeigte das deutsche Nachrichtenmagazin Der Spiegel auf der Titelseite der Februar-Ausgabe einen Mann mit rotem Kapuzenpulli, Schutzmasken, Schutzbrille und Kopfhörer mit der riesigen Überschrift “Coronavirus Made in China”. Diese Art der Berichterstattung löst nicht nur Panik und gegenseitige Schuldzuweisungen aus, sondern, wie wir gesehen haben, auch rassistische Diskriminierung.

Korientation e.V., ein selbstorganisiertes Netzwerk, das sich auf die Selbstdarstellung asiatischer Deutscher in Kultur und Medien konzentriert, erstellte eine Corona-Rassismus Rubrik mit Nachrichten zu Rassismus während Corona und schrieb Artikel, die den strukturellen Rassismus dahinter diskutieren. Wer sich informieren möchte, kann dies unter www.korientation.de tun.

 

[IWS RADIO JINGLE]

 

DAHYE
Wow, in kurzer Zeit ist so viel passiert! Ich meine, es macht keinen Sinn, Asiat*innen als einen Virus zu betrachten, aber das ist so leicht passiert.

 

HEAWON
Ernsthaft. Es war so einfach, Asiat*innen anzugreifen. Viele Kollektive reagierten auf den Rassismus gegen Asiat*innen während Corona überall auf der Welt, auch in Berlin.

 

DAHYE
Ich habe gehört, dass es eine Gruppe gibt, die Erfahrungen gesammelt hat und immer noch sammelt, um statistische Beweise zu erbringen, oder?

 

HEAWON
Ja, Asian Voices Europe arbeitet daran. Asian Voices Europe ist eine junge NGO, die im März mit dem Ziel gegründet wurde, anti-asiatischen Rassismus in Europa zu bekämpfen. Zurzeit sind sie eine Gruppe von 13 Menschenrechtsaktivist*innen, Akademiker*innen, Journalist*innen, Designer*innen, Produktmanager*innen und Übersetzer*innen. Diese Gruppe setzt sich für den Schutz der Menschenrechte von Asiat*innen und der asiatischen Diaspora ein, die in den letzten Monaten inmitten der COVID-19-Pandemie massiv rassistische Vorfälle erlebt haben. Lasst uns das Interview mit Aktivistin Jiye von dieser Gruppe für weitere Informationen hören. Da Jiye in Holland ist und wir in Berlin sind, haben wir uns entschlossen, ihr unsere Fragen zu schicken, und sie beantwortete sie in Form von Sprachnachrichten.

Kannst du uns bei deiner Vorstellung über den Prozess erzählen, wie du die Organisation Asian Voices Europe in den Niederlanden gegründet hast?

 

JIYE
Hallo, mein Name ist Jiye, und ich bin die Gründerin und Vorsitzende von Asian Voices Europe, einer gemeinnützigen Organisation mit Sitz in den Niederlanden, die sich die Bekämpfung von anti-asiatischem Rassismus zum Ziel gesetzt hat. Wir begannen diese Organisation zu gründen, weil… nun, ich begann die Initiative im Februar zu starten, damals im März, als ich selbst einen rassistischen Vorfall erlebte – wie wir sagen: das Persönliche ist politisch! Meine Neugierde und mein Gefühl mich in den Niederlanden unsicher zu fühlen haben mich eigentlich dazu gebracht, etwas zu beginnen, das viel größer wurde, als ich jemals erwartet hatte.

Ende Februar, an einem Montag, fuhr ich mit dem Fahrrad von meinem Tanzkurs nach Hause – ich weiß, dass es ein Montag war, weil ich montags Unterricht hatte – und zwei Leute auf einem Roller schrien mich auf Chinesisch an und versuchten, mich zu schlagen. Als das passierte, war es dunkel, es war niemand sonst auf der Straße. Also fuhr ich sehr schnell mit dem Fahrrad nach Hause. Während ich mit dem Fahrrad nach Hause fuhr, ärgerte mich das sehr, denn am selben Morgen hatte ich in den niederländischen Nachrichten gelesen, dass eine 24-jährige chinesisch-niederländische Frau, eine Studentin namens Sindi, in einem Fahrstuhl angegriffen worden war, und das geschah, weil sie die Leute im Fahrstuhl bat, nicht mehr das Corona-Lied zu singen. Das ist ein niederländisches Lied, das im Radio gespielt wurde und in dem es heißt: “Vorbeugung ist besser als die Chines*innen”. Und als sie die Leute bat, mit dem Singen dieses Liedes aufzuhören, griffen sie sie körperlich an und einer von ihnen griff sie sogar mit einem Messer an. Sie haben die Angreifer*innen noch nicht gefunden.

Während ich also mit dem Fahrrad nach Hause fuhr, war da die Wut, die Angst, und als ich nach Hause kam, rief ich die Polizei an, meldete den Vorfall und machte einen Termin aus, um in der nächsten Woche auf die Polizeiwache zu gehen. Was ich aber auch tat, ist, dass ich eine Umfrage in einem Google Doc gestartet habe. Es war eine sehr einfache Umfrage, sehr spontan. Denn nicht nur dieser Vorfall mit mir oder mit Sindi, sondern auch in den letzten zwei oder drei Wochen hatte ich in den sozialen Medien immer mehr Beiträge über Asiat*innen und vor allem Koreaner*innen gesehen, weil ich selbst Südkoreanerin bin. Darüber, wie sie in die Straßenbahn eingestiegen sind und wie man ihnen aus dem Weg ging. Ich hatte auch die Erfahrung gemacht, dass Menschen vor mir wegliefen zur anderen Seite der Straßenbahn, sobald ich in Den Haag in die Straßenbahn einstieg. Aber es gab viel, viel schwerwiegendere Vorfälle und noch viel mehr Ereignisse und ich wollte in der Lage sein, sie an einem Ort zu sammeln, um sehen zu können, wie der Status quo tatsächlich war. Diese Umfrage hat also wirklich die ganze Bewegung ins Leben gerufen und wurde im niederländischen Bericht von discriminatie.nl – dem nationalen Verband der Antidiskriminierungsstellen – zitiert. Und seit ich mit der Umfrage begonnen hatte, habe ich auch angefangen, auf Menschen zuzugehen, um zu sehen, ob es andere gibt, die etwas tun wollen. Ich weiß nicht genau, was es ist, aber wir müssen etwas gegen diesen Rassismus unternehmen, der von Asiat*innen erfahren wird, und ich hatte großes Glück, denn wir haben nun 10 Mitglieder, die sich Anfang März an mich gewandt haben. Gleich nachdem ich mit der Umfrage begonnen hatte und am 14. März hatten wir unser erstes Gruppentreffen und jetzt ist es Ende Juli. Es ist echt verrückt, wie schnell die Zeit vergeht und wie viel wir erreichen konnten.

 

HEAWON
Danke Jiye. Laut einer Studie sehen die meisten Vorfälle so aus: Menschen rufen “Coronavirus”. Oft machen sie dazu Drohgesten oder sie verhalten sich beleidigend zb indem sie spucken. Diese Vorfälle kamen in allen Ländern Europas vor. Bitte erzähl uns mehr darüber.

 

JIYE
Asian Voices Europe hat gerade die Daten der survey 1.0 zu Ende ausgewertet. Survey 1.0 wurde im Februar von mir initiiert. Als ich an diesem Montag nach Hause kam, habe ich einen Google-Fragebogen eingerichtet um Daten darüber zu sammeln, was asiatische Menschen während der Coronazeit erleben. Diese Daten wurden jetzt von der Forscherin Haebin und ihren Teammitgliedern Ahreum and Seunghye ausgewertet. Zusammengefasst die Ergebnisse: Insgesamt gab 300 Fälle. Befragt wurden 117 Menschen. Bei der Hälfte der Fälle handelt es sich um verbale Attacken. Dazu gehört: Anschreien und das Rufen von Sachen wie “Corona”, “Chinese” oder “Geh weg” etc. Das ist die häufigste Art von Rassismus. Asiatisch gelesene Menschen erfahren sie auch außerhalb von Coronazeiten. Bei circa 60 Fälle handelte es sich um körperliche Belästigungen oder Angriffe. Menschen wurden körperlich verletzt – sie wurden gestossen, in manchen Fällen wurden Steine nach ihnen geworfen. 90 Fälle (30 Prozent von aller Fälle) waren Mikroaggressionen. Diese lassen sich rechtlich nur schwer verfolgen, können oft nicht bei der Polizei angezeigt werden, doch ihre Auswirkungen sind allgegenwärtig. Dazu gehört zb: Menschen, die dich in der Öffentlichkeit anstarren und rassistische Witze machen, Menschen, die dich anspucken, die die Geste “Schlitzaugen” machen, die oft dazu verwendet wird Asiat*innen zu beleidigen, Fake-Husten und mobbing. Was ich interessant fand: Die Anzahl der körperlichen Belästigungen war sehr hoch. Das hatte ich in der Vergangenheit so noch nicht erlebt. Aber ich kann mich auch täuschen, da es bisher keine umfassenden Daten zu anti-asiatischem Rassismus gibt.

 

HEAWON
Wie wird es mit deiner Arbeit weiter gehen?

 

JIYE
Um diese Fälle von anti-asiatischem Rassismus zu bekämpfen haben wir im Mai eine Petition auf wemove.eu gestartet. Die Petition läuft aktuell noch. Die Petition adressiert die Antidiskriminierungsstelle des Bundes und die Europäische Kommission gegen Rassismus und Intoleranz. Wir haben sie aufgefordert eine Hotline einzurichten, bei der Hassverbrechen gegen Asiat*innen gemeldet werden können. Solche Services gibt es bereits, zb in New York City. Es freut uns, dass wir, drei Tage nachdem wir die Petition gestartet haben, bereits eine Antwort von der Antidiskriminierungsstelle des Bundes bekommen haben. Im Juni haben wir uns mit ihnen getroffen. Im Gespräch stellte sich heraus: Weder die Antidiskriminierungsstelle des Bundes noch die Europäische Kommission gegen Rassismus und Intoleranz hat die Befugnis so eine Hotline zu initiieren, da beide beratende Stellen sind. Daher haben sie uns mit anderen Organisationen auf Länderebene, die in der Lage solche Projekte umzusetzen und mit europäischen Netzwerken zu Anti-Rassismus und Initiativen zu Antidiskriminierung in Kontakt gesetzt. Im Moment hat die Petition 1.500 Unterzeichnende, aber wir denken, dass sie ihr Ziel schon erreicht hat, weil sie uns mit den deutschen Bundesbehörden in Kontakt gebracht hat.

Der erste Schritt Richtung Lösung ist das Problem zu benennen. Das haben wir mit der Umfrage bezweckt. Der nächste Schritt ist Wege zu finden wie wir dem anti-asiatischen Rassismus begegnen. Im Moment laufen bei uns zwei Projekte und wir suchen auch noch nach Helfer*innen, falls jemand Interesse hat. Bei dem ersten Projekte geht es darum ein Anleitungsbuch für den Umgang mit anti- asiatischem Rassismus in Europa zu erstellen. Das erste Projekt richtet sich an asiatische Expats und Immigrant*innen, die in europäischen Staaten leben. Doch wir werden erstmal mit Fällen in den Niederlanden und in Deutschland starten. Der naheliegende Grund dafür ist, dass wir als als neu gegründete Non-Profit Organisation begrenzte Ressourcen haben. Hinzu kommt der Fakt, dass sich unser Mitglieder momentan auf die Niederlande und Deutschland verteilen.

In dem Anleitungsbuch soll es zb darum gehen: Wie kann man mit Rassismus umgehen, wie kann man rassistische Vorfälle melden, wem kann man sie melden, wie läuft das dann ab und wie kann man es einfacher machen, wie kann man die Abläufe steuern. Zum Beispiel gibt es nicht nur den Weg solche Vorfälle der Polizei zu melden, du kannst auch emotionale und psychologische Unterstützung bekommen, die von der Krankenversicherung getragen wird. In den Niederlanden zb gibt es einen Service namens “Sclachtofferhulp”, was wortwörtlich übersetzt “Opferhilfe” heißt. Dieser Service wird in Kooperation mit der Polizei den Opfern zur Verfügung gestellt zb bei sexuellen, körperlichen oder sonstigen Übergriffen.

Im zweiten Teil der Anleitung wird es darum gehen, Niederländer*innen, Deutschen oder anderen Europäern Rassismus nahe zu bringen, weil Asiat*innen in beiden Ländern eine kleine Minderheit in der Bevölkerung sind. Wenn man sich in den Niederlanden nur die ostasiatische Bevölkerung ansieht, dann machen sie 0,7% der Gesamtbevölkerung aus und in Deutschland liegt diese Zahl ungefähr bei 3%. Die Zahlen sind also niedrig und das bedeutet, dass es Menschen gibt, die in Deutschland oder in den Niederlanden leben und die noch nie eine asiatische Person getroffen haben oder mit einer asiatischen Person gesprochen haben. Wenn man mit bestimmten Menschen noch nie in Kontakt gekommen ist, wenn du dann von Problemen hörst, die nur diese spezifische Gruppe betreffen, dann ist es sehr unwahrscheinlich, dass du diese Anliegen ernst nimmst und damit empathisch bist.
Daher ist unser Ziel Menschen mit Methoden auszustatten, damit sie in der Lage sind auf nicht-konfrontative und friedliche Art zu erklären: Ich erlebe Rassismus so, das fühle ich und das ist das, was ich mir wünsche.

Dieses Projekt “Anleitungsbuch” ist unser erstes Projekt mit einem externen Partner: metooasians e.V., eine NGO aus Berlin. Die NGO wurde gegründet um asiatischen Frauen in Deutschland zu helfen, die sexuelle Übergriffe erlebt haben. Wir sind sehr froh mit ihnen zu kooperieren. Unser zweiter Partner ist die Asian Advocacy Platform, das ist eine Webseite, die wir gerade aufbauen, eine Plattform, die dazu dient, klare Darstellungen von anti-asiatischen, rassistischen Vorfällen in Text und Bild zur Verfügung zu stellen. Die Daten aus der Umfrage werden verwendet um in Zahlen zu verdeutlichen, wie wir als Asiat*innen Rassismus erfahren, aber wir werden auch alle anderen Elemente wie zb Texte und andere Beispiele inkludieren. Das ist also das Projekt, an dem wir gerade arbeiten und wir hoffen, dass es noch dieses Jahr gezeigt werden kann.

 

DAHYE
Vielen Dank, dass du dir die Zeit genommen hast um mit uns zu sprechen, Jiye. Danke auch für die Arbeit von deiner Gruppe, diese Welt zu einem lebenswerten, besseren Ort zu machen.

Heute haben wir noch einen besonderen Gast: Esra Nayeon Karakaya. Wir sprechen mit ihr über das Stereotyp von Asiat*innen als “gute Migrant*innen”.

 

HEAWON
Oh, ich bin ein großer Fan von “BlackRock Talk” und “Karakaya Talk”!! Ich kann es kaum erwarten, das Interview zu hören.

 

DAHYE
Ich habe mit ihr gesprochen. Wir hören nun ein aufgezeichnete Interview.

 

DAHYE
Kannst du dich vorstellen?

 

ESRA
Ja. Mein Name ist Esra Nayeon Karakaya. Ich bin Journalistin und Videoproduzentin. In den letzten zwei oder drei Jahren habe ich an meiner eigene Talk Show gearbeitet. Es fing als “BlackRock Talk” an. Dann haben wir für eine Weile mit einer öffentlich-rechtlichen Sendeanstalt kooperiert. Sechs Monate lang haben wir unter dem Namen “Karakaya Talk” produziert. Mittlerweile sind wir wieder unabhängig und wir werden wahrscheinlich unsere Arbeit und dem Namen “Karakaya Talks”, mit einem S am Schluss, fortsetzen.

Ich habe auch mit und für das Format “Datteltätter” produziert. Das ist ein Youtubekanal der Inhalte produziert um die muslimische Jugend in Deutschland zu empowern. So ganz allgemein… wenn mich zb Sendeanstalten anfragen.. würde ich sagen: Ich produziere Videos, die oft eine gesellschaftspolitische Relevanz haben.

 

DAHYE
Wow. Du machst so viel (lacht). Wie ist es zu den Talk Shows gekommen, die du produzierst?

 

ESRA
Ich glaube, das war circa vor drei Jahren, in 2017. Ich habe mir damals einen online Raum vorgestellt, in dem wir zusammenkommen und über alles Mögliche sprechen können. Dinge, die in den deutschen Mainstream Medien nicht vorkamen. Und ich wollte diese Gespräche mit Menschen führen, von denen ich das Gefühl hatte, dass sie unterrepräsentiert sind in… diese Menschen sind gewöhnlich strukturell, institutionell marginalisiert in Deutschland. Ich erinnere mich an die erste Folge, die wir gemacht haben und ich war…. Ich denke… ich werde mich immer an diesen Moment erinnern, ich hab fünf Menschen mit Hijab eingeladen und damit quasi ein Statement gesetzt. Obwohl wir sehr, sehr klein waren… ich denke es war damals sehr wichtig für mich einen Raum zu kreieren und alle wissen zu lassen, dass wir wichtig sind, so wie jede*r in diesem Land oder jede*r in dieser Welt wichtig ist.

 

DAHYE
Ja, ich war… wirklich beeindruckt von der Show. Es hat mich emotional gemacht, all diese wundervollen Frauen in einer Aufnahme zu sehen. Die Visualisierung ihrer Existenz und das Bedeutsammachen. Damit auch die Community vor Ort weiß, diese Frauen sind hier und sie können alle auf einmal zu einer Talk Show kommen.

 

ESRA
Ja.

 

DAHYE
Das wurde davor nicht abgebildet.

 

ESRA
Ja, was ich für verrückt halte und… Ich verstehe nicht, wie das überhaupt möglich ist… Ich weiß überhaupt nicht, wie deutsche Medien nicht verstanden haben, wie wichtig es ist, bestimmte Menschen zu repräsentieren. Und es ist verrückt zu denken, dass das einzige Mal… das erste Mal – ich glaube, in der deutschen Geschichte – wo so viele Frauen mit Hijab visuell dargestellt wurden, eine Produktion war, die selbst gemacht wurde, ohne Finanzierung, durch ein selbstgemachtes Kollektiv. Und es ist irgendwie… es ist schön für uns, weil wir in der Lage waren, das zu realisieren. Aber es ist auch irgendwie traurig, zu sehen, dass das… dass das der Punkt ist, an dem Deutschland im Moment noch steht. Bis zum heutigen Tag.

 

DAHYE
Ja. Ich möchte in diesem Zusammenhang unser Gespräch ein wenig auf den asiatischen Schwerpunkt lenken. Asiat*innen werden, wie du weißt, als gute Migrant*innen dargestellt, aber für mich… es klingt wie ein Kompliment, aber für mich ist das, was sich hinter diesem Ausdruck verbirgt, ziemlich suspekt.

 

ESRA
Auf jeden Fall.

 

DAHYE
Es bedeutet etwa, dass Asiat*innen unterwürfig, fleißig und eifrig sind. Aber eigentlich, um ehrlich zu sein, bin ich die faulste Person der Welt. Ich bin Asiatin, aber ich bin nicht eifrig. Ich bin nicht fleißig. Zudem gibt es die Vorstellung: Andere Migrant*innen sollten es ihnen gleichtun um sich in einem Land gut einzuleben. Was denkst du also darüber?

 

ESRA
Ich stimme also definitiv zu. Es gibt diese Art von Narrativ, dass, wie du weißt, Asiat*innen, Südasiat*innen im Allgemeinen die Klugen, die Intelligenten, aber am meisten… vor allem die Gehorsamen sind. Und ich denke, dass dieses Narrativ benutzt wird, um bestimmte Communities oder Gruppen von Minderheiten in Deutschland zu spalten, nicht wahr? Wie zum Beispiel, oh, du, Community A, du bist so gehorsam und gut, auch wenn wir dir nicht den ganzen Zugang geben, aber wir machen dir Komplimente. Aber eigentlich schaue ich auf Community B, und ich sage Community B, du hast auf allen Ebenen versagt, und du solltest besser mal zu Community A schauen. Und was dann manchmal passiert – was passieren kann und passiert ist und manchmal bis heute passiert – ist, dass Community B auf Community A wütend wird, und dann ist Community A wie: Yo, du solltest mehr wie wir sein, und Community B ist wie: Halt die Klappe, Mann. Du weißt nichts, du weißt nichts. Anstatt sich darauf zu konzentrieren, warum diese Narrative existieren und die Narrative in Frage zu stellen, tun Communities… also greift dieses Konzept… dieses koloniale Konzept von Teilen und Erobern, und die Community beginnt sich nicht zu mobilisieren und zu vereinen, sondern sich voneinander zu trennen.

 

DAHYE
Ja, ich meine, ich frage mich immer, wer bist du, um die vorbildlichen Minderheiten zu bestimmen? Wir sind diejenigen, die uns identifizieren sollen, und wir sind als asiatische Community nicht homogen… Asien ist so groß, wir sind Individuen, jede*r ist super anders, aber dass sie uns als vorbildliche Minderheiten kennzeichnen… Und es war auch traurig für mich, dass ich das Gefühl hatte, ständig meine Existenz beweisen zu müssen. Ich muss beweisen, dass ich eine gute Migrantin bin, um hier zu bleiben, um von der Gesellschaft akzeptiert zu werden, zu der ich nicht gehöre. Aber eigentlich sollte jede*r zu einer Gesellschaft gehören, in der er*sie lebt.

 

ESRA
Auf jeden Fall. Also, ich habe einen Gedanken und ich… Ich frage mich, was du davon hältst. Weil du nicht in Deutschland geboren und aufgewachsen bist, wirst du also offensichtlich… du hast gewisse Kämpfe, die Menschen… die nicht deutsche Staatsbürgerschaft haben. Du wirst … du musst … du musst dem System gehorsam sein, um bleiben zu können. Du bist also sehr abhängig vom System, richtig? Also, was wäre nun, wenn wir über die Menschen sprechen, die in Deutschland aufgewachsen sind und die deutsche Staatsbürgerschaft besitzen?

Was ich beobachtet habe, ist – und bitte korrigiere mich, wenn ich falsch liege, es ist nur ein Gefühl – dass vor allem ostasiatische Communities in Berlin, die… die in Deutschland aufgewachsen sind, oft… weniger politisiert sind als z.B. muslimische, migrantisierte (Übersetzung racialized) Community. Und ich manchmal… das ist auch manchmal … das bringt Konflikte zwischen diesen Communities mit sich. Oftmals bin ich … ich werde wütend. Weil ich auch in dieser Position bin, wo ich eine koreanische Mutter habe – also ich habe definitiv die koreanische Erfahrung – aber dann habe ich auch einen türkischen Vater. Und nun ja, in Deutschland bin ich als Muslimin definitiv migrantisiert (Übersetzung racialized). Das steht fest. Also oft wenn ich Menschen innerhalb ostasiatischen deutschen Communities sehen, wenn ich sie treffen und mit ihnen spreche – Menschen, die hier geboren und auch aufgewachsen sind oder Menschen, die nur in Deutschland aufgewachsen sind – dann habe ich oft das Gefühl, dass es an Verständnis und Solidarität für andere Communities mangelt und manchmal macht mich das wütend. Aber ich verstehe auch, dass das Teil dieser Narrative ist: Oh, du bist ein*e gute*r Immigrant*in, weißt du, und du… du bist gehorsam. Wir werden euch also nicht allzu sehr auf die Nerven gehen. Aber ich denke, was ich mir wünsche, ist, dass mehr ostasiatische Communities aufstehen. Begreifen, dass wir alle im selben Boot sitzen.

 

DAHYE
Ja, ich bin völlig einverstanden. Ich kann nicht so viel als Vertreterin der ostasiatischen Community sagen, da ich erst seit etwa zweieinhalb Jahren hier lebe. Aber dennoch finde ich es sehr wichtig, dass wir solidarisch miteinander sind, mit jeder Community. Aber ich fühle mich manchmal sehr isoliert, wenn ich in anderen Communities bin, weil sie glauben, dass Asiat*innen nicht mit Rassismus konfrontiert werden, auch wenn sie grundsätzlich Rassismus ablehnen oder Menschenrechten ernst nehmen, sagen sie Sachen wie: Oh, ihr seid Asiat*innen, ihr habt ein bequemes Leben, weil euch hier niemand nervt.

 

ESRA
Genau.

 

DAHYE
Eigentlich werden wir ziemlich oft belästigt. Und mit der aktuellen Situation wurde das sehr deutlich. Aber selbst zuvor: Asiat*innen erleben strukturellen Rassismus.

 

ESRA
Eindeutig.

 

DAHYE
Aber dennoch glaube ich, dass du auch aus dem anderen Blickwinkel Recht hast. Denn andere Communities finden ostasiatische Communities oft nicht kritisch genug gegenüber dem, was sie (die anderen Communities) durchmachen. Und aus ostasiatischer Sicht finde ich: ja, wir haben diese Probleme ja auch. Aber das wiederum verstehen die anderen Communities nicht ganz.

 

ESRA
Richtig.

 

DAHYE
Aber was ich wirklich wichtig finde, ist: Wir sind nicht diejenigen, die gegeneinander kämpfen sollen…

 

ESRA
Definitiv.

 

DAHYE
…und kritisieren: Ja, ich habe mehr Schwierigkeiten als du. Du hast weniger Schwierigkeiten als ich… Ich meine, das ist nicht wirklich wichtig, oder? Wir alle machen diesen strukturellen Rassismus durch, und das passiert mit jeder einzelnen Person, jeder einzelnen Person aus jeder Community, die nicht weiß ist, richtig?

 

ESRA
Genau richtig.

 

DAHYE
Wir müssen also gemeinsam einen Block bauen, Solidarität zeigen, um diese Welt zu verändern, um ein besserer Ort zu sein – damit unsere nächste Generation ein besseres Leben haben kann, zumindest ein bisschen.

 

ESRA
Stimmt. Aber ich denke – ich stimme dir zu, definitiv! – Aber ich glaube, es gibt einen Unterschied. Man ist also… ok, ein Gedanke, den ich habe, ist – ich will nicht verallgemeinern – ich denke, bevor ich…. es ist eine sehr allgemeine Beobachtung, die ich gemacht habe, und ich denke, das ist nicht sehr fair auch gegenüber all den Aktivist*innen in Berlin und in Deutschland, den asiatischen – ostasiatischen und südasiatischen – Aktivist*innen, die so hart daran gearbeitet haben, das Bewusstsein zu schärfen und ihre Umgebung zu politisieren. Also shout out an Vicky und Thao, all die Leute, die diese Arbeit seit Jahren machen. Und gleichzeitig, ja, du hast Recht, dass wir alle gemeinsam dabei sind, aber ich glaube, wir brauchen Verständnis füreinander. Ich denke, wir müssen verstehen, was es bedeutet als Ostasiat*innen angegriffen oder rassifiziert zu werden. Ich denke, es ist wichtig, dass ich auch weiß, was es bedeutet, ein*e Asiat*in mit dunkler Haut zu sein. Ich denke, es… die Erfahrung ist einfach eine ganz andere und ich muss sie kennen, damit ich solidarisch sein kann. Und ich will, dass meine… dass alle Menschen – meine ganze Umgebung – verstehen, was es bedeutet einen Hijab zu tragen, was es bedeutet als Muslim*a oder als Kanak*in rassifiziert zu werden. Also ich denke, es ist sehr… ähm, ja, wir müssen zusammenstehen, aber auch… wir dürfen diese Spaltung nicht zulassen und müssen gleichzeitig Verständnis für die unterschiedlichen Erfahrungen haben, die wir machen.

 

DAHYE
Ja. Ich stimme voll und ganz zu. Und ich denke, jede*r hat so seine*ihre unterschiedlichen Erfahrungen, aber wir müssen miteinander teilen, welche Art von Erfahrung wir haben. Aber manchmal finde ich… auch ich mache das manchmal so: Wir werden wählerisch. Wir konzentrieren uns mehr auf die Erfahrungen, die wir haben – also nicht wir, tut mir leid – also das, was jede*r einzelne von uns hat. Also fangen sie an, sich darauf zu konzentrieren. Und wenn sie anfangen, sich darauf zu konzentrieren, gehen sie tief ins Innere, und dann ist es wirklich schwer, die Erfahrungen andere*r zu verstehen. Ich spreche mit meiner Erfahrung. Wenn ich mich auf meine Härten, meine Schwierigkeiten konzentriere, kann ich nicht wirklich auf andere Seiten schauen. Aber ich halte es für sehr wichtig, dass wir eine Plattform haben, auf der wir unsere Narrative austauschen können, so dass wir eine breitere Plattform schaffen können, die uns mehr vereint, weil wir nicht gespalten sein sollen, oder? Wir sollen alle zusammen sein. Und deshalb haben wir dich eingeladen, weil wir durch diese Radiosendung zeigen wollten, dass wir alle dieses Problem haben und dass wir alle zusammen sind. Und das führt zu dem Bild des guten Migrant*innen. Ich… ich habe diese Frage, OK, wenn es eine gute Minderheit oder eine vorbildliche Minderheit gibt, wer ist dann der*die schlechte Immigrant*in? Wer ist der*die gute Immigrant*in?

Dieses Bild wird auf jede*n übertragen – wir alle werden von diesem Bild beeinflusst. Das ist es also, was die Menschen trennt oder? Zum Beispiel, wie du gesagt hast, muslimische Gemeinschaften zu beschuldigen, wie, oh ja, wenn du ein*e gute*r Migrant*in sein willst: du musst unserem Beispiel folgen. Du musst blah, blah, blah, blah sein. Aber das Stereotyp stammt nicht von Migrant*innen.

 

ESRA
Auf jeden Fall.

 

DAHYE
Es stammt von der kolonialen Herrschaft.

 

ESRA
Genau.

 

DAHYE
Ich wollte dich noch fragen – wie war das für dich? Du hast gesagt, dass du als zwei Arten von Migrantin angesehen wurdest. Man hat dich als gute und als schlechte Migrantin definiert. Wie war das für dich? War es schwierig für dich, das zu überwinden, oder war es dir einfach egal?

 

ESRA
Also ich denke; als ich jünger war, ich weiß nicht… Ich dachte nicht, dass es die Möglichkeit gibt das zu überwinden. Ich dachte… dass das eben so ist. So läuft es eben. Und es war offensichtlich für mich, dass ich wegen meiner türkischen Herkunft, niemals vollständig in die asiatische Kategorie komme. Das ist interessant, denn obwohl ich mich selbst als die Person identifiziere, die ich bin, habe ich das Gefühl…. Ich habe viele Erfahrungen gemacht, die -so wie bei uns allen – von unseren Eltern oder unserer Umgebung beeinflusst sind. Ich bin … Ich habe … Ich denke, als ich aufgewachsen bin, haben sich viele Menschen schwer getan, zu akzeptieren, dass ich etwas türkisches und etwas koreanisches in mir habe. Ihnen wäre es lieber zu sagen: Ja, ja das ist türkisch, du [bist] türkisch, Mädchen – du bist Muslima, denn offensichtlich ist dieses Gen sehr stark und dominant. Das ist einfach so. Und das koreanische Gen ist sehr unterwürfig, es kann nicht… es kann nicht gegen das dominante türkische… türkische Gen gewinnen. Also bist du komplett türkisch, oder? Was ich oft als sehr … es hat mich oft meiner koreanischen Identität beraubt. Was ich nicht mochte, was ich nicht verstanden habe. Ich denke später… als ich verstanden habe warum … warum das passiert, habe ich angefangen das nicht zu mögen. Aber als ich jünger war, habe ich das nicht verstanden. Ich habe nicht verstanden, warum es Menschen so wichtig war, mich als türkischstämmig zu sehen, anstatt als koreanisch-türkisch. Ja.

Also das war der Anfang. Und ich habe einfach akzeptiert, dass es so ist. Diese Kategorisierung. Aber dann, als ich älter wurde, habe ich mit der Universität angefangen und ich habe mich politisiert. Ich denke, im Vergleich zu den Menschen in meiner Umgebung war ich eine Person, die sich eher spät politisiert hat. Und dann habe ich verstanden: Oh, ich verstehe die Narrative. Ich versteh das. Ich habe die soziale Norm verstanden und … das war als ich anfing mich selbst aus politischen Gründen deutsch zu nennen. Nicht weil ich mich als deutsch identifiziert, sondern aus politischen Gründen. Und bis zu dem heutigen Tag … ich denke, wir wissen alle, dass es immer noch weit verbreitet ist, Deutsch-sein mit weiß-sein gleichzusetzen. Also sagen die Leute Sachen wie: Oh, weißt du, ich bin deutsch. Sagen sie vor mir und ich so: Und selbst wenn du deutsch bist… aber erwähnst nicht die Sache mit dem weiß-sein? Was macht das … Was bin ich dann? Wir sind vielleicht im gleichen Krankenhaus geboren und trotzdem gibt es da etwas in dir, das es selbstverständlich findet, mich nicht deutsch zu nennen, richtig? Ich muss sagen, dass durch…. also es ist interessant, dass… als ich begonnen habe Deutschsein als politische Methode zu benutzen, habe ich auch angefangen mich so zu fühlen. Ich denke, dass war als ich Mitte zwanzig war. Aber ich muss sagen, dass ist etwas so Irrelevantes für mich, weil Deutschsein… ich verstehe, dass ich viele Privilegien wegen des Deutschseins habe. Es macht einen Unterschied im globalen Norden zu leben und alle diese Erfahrungen zu haben, alle diese Privilegien, die man durch die deutsche Staatsbürger*innenschaft hat. Aber dass ich deutsch bin, ist in einem deutschen Kontext… (klatscht in die Hände)

 

DAHYE
Ja.

 

ESRA
Mir ist aufgefallen, es reicht nicht diese Debatte zu führen, weil da etwas ist … da steckt ein viel größeres Problem dahinter, weißt du, die Identifizierung als Deutsche*r oder als Nicht-Deutsche*r. Also, ja.

 

DAHYE
Ja. Danke dass du deine Erfahrungen mit uns teilst. Ich kann das nachvollziehen… diese Leute, wenn sie eine BPoC Person sehen und wenn diese Menschen sagen, dass sie Deutsche sind, dann können die Menschen es nicht wirklich akzeptieren, denn es passt nicht in ihre Schublade. Zb eine Geschichte: Ich habe einen Freund. Wir sind zusammen zur Ärztin gegangen und er ist Deutscher. Er ist aufgewachsen … er wurde in Deutschland geboren und aufgezogen. Er hat eine Großmutter und einen deutschen Vater. Und die Ärztin hat gesagt: Oh dein Deutsch ist so gut. Wo hast du es gelernt? Und dann sagt er: Ich bin Deutscher. Aber sie war so: Also wo hast du es gelernt. Es ist sehr gut. Ich denke, dass ist nicht nur seine Geschichte, alle haben das schon einmal erlebt. Es ist lächerlich für mich. Was ist so besonders an einer deutschen Person, die fließend deutsch spricht? Es ist ihre Muttersprache, aber das können sie einfach nicht akzeptieren.

 

ESRA
Ich schwöre. Ich erinnere mich an die Universität, man. Ich meine, du kannst dir denken: okay, vielleicht wissen die Lehrer*innen es nicht. Aber jetzt bin ich an der Universität! Doch es waren Professor*innen, die Sachen wie “ Dein Deutsch ist einfach sehr gut. Sehr gut. Ja ja. Ich denke ich kann mit dir arbeiten.” gesagt haben. Und ??…, denn ich bin von dem*r Professor*in abhängig, ich sage einfach nichts, aber für mich denke ich: Mädchen, wo bin ich hier? Ich möchte nicht nach Hause gehe. Was ist das für ein Ort?

 

DAHYE
Nein, ich wollte … ich habe die Geschichte erzählt, damit Menschen … Zuhörer*innen, die Radio hören, niemals eine Person fragen ob sie*er deutsch sein … wo sie oder er deutsch gelernt hat, wenn die Person zuvor gesagt hat, dass sie deutsch ist. Oder? Selbst wenn sie BPoC sind, sie sind Deutsche. Dafür musst du nicht weiß sein

 

ESRA
Und auch so … denk mal darüber nach, wann du das Wort deutsch benutzt.

 

DAHYE
Ja.

 

ESRA
Sprichst du von dir selbst als ein*e Deutsche*r? Von wem noch sprichst du noch als Deutsche*r? Und wen nennst du nicht deutsch? Ich denke, dass ist sehr wichtig. Und auch… Ich meine, das ist … Ich denke, das ist ganz, ganz grundlegender Anstand. Nicht danach zu fragen, warum du so gut deutsch sprichst, nicht zu fragen, woher du kommst, nicht zu fragen, welche Sprachen jemand sonst noch so spricht, damit du… damit du herausfinden kannst, woher die Person sein könnte. Entspann dich einfach! Entspann dich einfach und fang einfach ein Gespräch mit der Person an, lerne die PERSON kennen.

 

DAHYE
Genau.

 

ESRA
Und zwar nicht race der Person, sondern die Person selbst. Und wenn du dich wohl fühlst und wenn sich die Person wohl fühlt, wird das ganz von selbst passieren.

 

DAHYE
Es ist Anstand, aber es ist nicht so verbreitet, genau. Es ist traurig. Es ist traurig das zu wissen. Und ja, vielen Dank dir! Und ja, es ist wirklich … es muss schwer sein, dass du dieses gute Migrant*in und schlechte Migrant*in Stereotyp hast, beide kollidieren in dir drin, nicht von dir selbst, aber von anderen Menschen, die [es] auf dich drauf projizieren. Aber wie hast du dich während der Corona-Zeit gefühlt? Also Asiat*innen gelten als Vorbild- Minderheiten, aber mit dem Virus waren sie während der COVID Situation Übergriffen ausgesetzt. Wie .. wie hast du das gesehen?

 

ESRA
Für mich, war es so, wie ich dir gesagt habe! Es ist eine Lüge: Dieses ganze Vorbild-Minderheiten- Ding ist eine Lüge. Wenn erst mal was passiert, ist es ganz einfach auf Asiat*innen – Ostasiat*innen, Südostasiat*innen – abzuzielen, sie anzugreifen. Es macht einfach keinen Unterschied. Also dieses ganze Narrativ über gute Communties oder schlechte Communties – ist Bockmist! Es ist nicht hilfreich. Es ist nicht hilfreich für die Communties, die marginalisiert sind. Ich denke, es macht keinen Sinn in ein Narrativ zu investieren, das sagt diese Menschen sind gut und die anderen sind es nicht. Denn diese Art von Kategorisierung ist … es entmenschlicht Menschen und schließt sie von allen Arten von Zugängen zu Ressourcen, die weiße Deutsche tagtäglich haben aus. Ich denke, es ist sehr wichtig diese Narrative im Jahr 2020 zu hinterfragen. Wir haben das 2019 nicht gemacht, nicht 2010, wir haben es nicht 1990 gemacht, aber jetzt ist es an der Zeit. Es ist nie zu spät. Lasst uns jetzt diese Narrative in Frage stellen.

 

DAHYE
Genau, da stimme ich völlig zu! Für mich war es schmerzhaft während der Corona-Zeit, natürlich, aber ich dachte auch, das ist ein Trugschluss. Es gibt keine Vorbild-Minderheit. Wenn sie wirklich Asiat*innen als Vorbild-Migrant*innen sehen, dann sollten sie wissen, wie erfolgreich diese asiatischen Länder auf die Corona-Virus-Situation reagierten und sie sollten es auf ihre eigenen Länder anwenden. Aber sie nehmen sie nicht als Vorbild wahr. Sie pflanzen nur die Vorbildrolle – das Stereotyp einer Vorbild-Minderheit- in die migrantische Gesellschaft, um so die gesamte Gesellschaft für sich selbst besser funktionierend zu machen. Also ist es mehr ein Instrumentalisieren. Es macht mich sehr wütend und sehr traurig, wie das ganze System funktioniert. Es ist nichts Neues, natürlich, aber wir sind müde das zu wissen, uns dem jeden Moment stellen zu müssen. Und das … es wurde offensichtlich, dass das eine Lüge ist.

 

ESRA
Ja ziemlich.

 

DAHYE
Wir definieren uns selbst, nicht du. Ja, das war toll! Um nun eine weiter Frage zu stellen: Was motiviert dich in diesen Tagen, deine Aktionen und deine Arbeit voran zu bringen?

 

ESRA
Das ist eine gute Frage, denn manchmal frage ich mich, wieso mache ich diese Dinge, die ich mache (lacht). Es ist so viel Arbeit. Es ist… es erfordert nicht nur Zeit, sondern auch Energie und wenn man das erst mal versteht … dass du so viel Zeit in etwas investierst, wovon du so wenig zurück bekommst. Weil ich in die Gesellschaft investiere, stimmt’s? Ich investiere in eine bessere Zukunft. Doch im Gegenzug… das, was ich zurück bekomme, passt nicht zu dem, was ich investiere. Es braucht also… ich brauche bestimmt Dinge in meinem Leben um … um mich daran zu erinnern warum ich diese Dinge überhaupt mache. Und ich bin an einem Punkt in meine Leben, an dem ich es einfach nicht weiß.Ich würde gerne sagen: Oh, es ist so wichtig weiter zu machen, blah blah. Aber jetzt an diesem Punkt in meinem Leben, bin ich einfach genervt und müde. Ich bin genervt und müde! Ich weiß nicht mal, warum ich diese ganze Arbeit überhaupt mache.

Und das ist auch ein Grund, warum ich darüber nachdenke mehr in Richtung Unterhaltung zu gehen, anstatt von gesellschaftspolitischen Inhalten. Denn am Ende des Tages, sobald ich etwas veröffentliche , da gibt es sehr viel Feedback… und das ist mal gut, mal furchtbar. Und ich finde Feedback wirklich wichtig! Aber wie gehst du mit toxischem Feedback um? Den ich muss dieses toxische Feedback schultern. Und da frage ich mich… ich möchte weitermachen, weil ich weiß, was wichtig ist, weil ich weiß, ich werde meinen Weg finden und ich werde … eine Lösung finden für die Situation, in der ich gerade stecke. Aber mein Ziel ist es, Deutschland dazu zubringen zu verstehen, dass es sehr wichtig ist alle Menschen zu repräsentieren. Und es ist auch wichtig, dass … dass wir wissen, dass wir eine Verantwortung gegenüber den Schwächsten im System haben, gegenüber den Verletzlichsten. Und das ist unsere Verantwortung. Es ist keine Wahl. Es ist keine Option. Es ist eine Verantwortung. Und da nehme ich auch mich selbst in die Pflicht und Verantwortung, weil auch wenn ich verschiedene Arten von Marginalisierung in Deutschland erlebe – strukturell und institutionell und offensichtlich auch individuell – weiß ich auch, dass ich auf einer anderen Ebene privilegiert bin. Und ich muss wissen, dass ich diese Privilegien und die Verantwortung nutzen muss um Gutes zu tun.

 

DAHYE
Danke für deine Ehrlichkeit! Ich denke, das ist so typisch: Du kannst genervt und müde sein, weil es nicht einfach ist. Aber ich muss dir sagen, du empowerst so viele Menschen mit deinem Sein und wie du dich selbst positioniert, dass du so mutig bist vor die Kameras zu gehen und Menschen zu sagen: Ich existiert hier, wir existieren hier, du existierst hier. Wir sind alle wertvolle Menschen. Es ist egal wo du herkommst, ganz egal welchen Hintergrund du hast, du bist … du bist ein wichtiger Mensch und deine Geschichte ist wertvoll und es wert gehört zu werden. Also ich denke, dass was du machst ist sehr wichtig.

 

ESRA
Danke dir.

 

DAHYE
Und ich bin sehr dankbar, dass du ein so tolles Programm produzierst und so vielen Menschen Inspiration gibst und sie empowerst. Ich finde, du bist wunderbar! Ich bin so glücklich. Und ich bin sehr stolz auf dich und darauf, dass du meine Freundin bist (lacht). Yeah, also zum Schluss möchte ich noch den Menschen, die zuhören sagen, sie sollen nach den nächsten Krakakya Talks Ausschau halten. Mit einem S am Ende.

 

ESRA
Ja.

 

DAHYE
Und abonniert den Kanal und lasst Esra liebevolle Kommentare da.

 

ESRA
Ja.

 

DAHYE
Damit sie weitermachen kann. Ich denke, es ist jetzt für dich an der Zeit deine Erde auszuwählen, sie ruhen zu lassen und dann wieder Samen anzusetzen. Dann werden sie auch wieder wachsen. Gib den Menschen Früchte, so wie du es auch bis jetzt gemacht hast.

 

ESRA
Das ist schön gesagt.

 

DAHYE
Danke, dass du deine Erfahrungen und Ideen heute mit uns geteilt hast!

 

ESRA
Vielen Dank, dass ihr mich eingeladen habt.

 

HEAWON
Vielen Dank, Frauen! Hallo zusammen, ihr hört IWS Radio – eine Podcast-Reihe über die Erfahrung von Migrantinnen. Die Show heute heißt Anti-Asiatischer Rassismus, der Mythos der Vorbild-Minderheit und COVID-19. Nach der Pause, hören wir von Ngoc, die gerade in den USA ist, sie spricht mit Thao, einer Schriftstellerin und Community Organizer über ihr Kollektiv DAMN.

 

DAHYE
Wir hören und jetzt einen Song aus dem Film “Magic Zipper”. Die Regisseurin, Suna Lim, wurde von der Geschichte ihrer Freundin inspiriert, die als Schwarze Person in Brasilien aufgewachsen ist. Der Rap-Song kommt am Ende des Filmes vor. Tim, der Hauptcharakter, bringt durch den Rap-Song zum Ausdruck, dass er den Magic Zipper nicht mehr braucht, while the magic zipper triggers that he is searching for it.

[SONG: MAGIC ZIPPER]

*Der Song ist unvollständig übersetzt
Komposition von Yoonji Kim
Lyrics von Juni Lee, Suna Lim

Zipper
Hey hey Tim!
wer ist die neben dir. deine neue Freundin aus Korea?
die brauchst du nicht. Du weißt. Du brauchst mich.
Also hör mich mal jetzt zu!!
Hey, hey Tim!

Zipper
Ich weiß du suchst immer nach mir, immer nach mir immer nach mir und
Ich weiß sogar, dass du Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst und
Deine Badeente sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch.
Denn ich bin dein Magic Zipper!

Tim
Hi ich bin Tim vielleicht kennst du mich und Uwe,
er ist mein bester Freund der von vielen Zügen träumt.
Sue mit ihrer Blumentasse kam aus Korea
wie ein Genie aus einer Lampe wir wussten nicht wo her.
2NE1 sagt “Bag Su Cheo Nado ddaro Chumul Cheo [ Klatsch in die Hände und ich tanze auch dazu]
Uwe hört gern “Kung Jja Jja Kung Jjak” und klatscht dabei Jjak Jjak Jjak!

Hi ich bin Tim, vielleicht kennst du mich und Uwe,
er ist mein bester Freund, er träumt von vielen Zügen,
Sue mit ihrem flower cup kam aus Korea
wie Genie aus der Flasche wir wussten nicht woher.
2NE1 says “Bag Su Cheo Nado Ddara Chumuel Cheo”
Uwe listens to Kung Jja Jja Kung Jjak and claps to it Jjak Jjak Jjak!

Tim
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- bin ich doch selbst
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- Super wie Uwe yeah!

Tim
Ich weiß nichts über Brasilien
aber alles über Brarups Zuglinien
Lolli’s rauch ich heute auch
ob Erdbeere, Zitrone, sag mir wenn du eine brauchst
Magic Zipper du willst mich verändern
steck mich nicht in eine Box mit viel zu hohen Rändern
Lass mich so bleiben wie ich bin,
mir gefällt es so, MFG Dein Tim

Tim und Zipper
Ich weiß du suchst immer nach mir, immer nach mir immer nach mir und
Ich weiß sogar, dass du Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst, Lolli’s rauchst und
Deine Badeente sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch.
Deine Badeente sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch, sucht mich auch.

Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- bin ich doch selbst
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- Super wie Uwe yeah!
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- bin ich doch selbst
Zipper was willst du denn Mich finden kann ich auch
Du gehörst geschlossen Magic- Super wie Uwe yeah!

Aha! hey oma! was machst du hier?
kommt der Zug überhaupt mal an?
Ah.. doch ich hab da was gehört..

————————————————–

 

NGOC
Wow ich liebe Rap, danke fürs Teilen!

Übrigens Hallo an Alle, ich bin Ngoc, ein Mitglied von International Women* Space. Im Moment bin ich in den USA. Hier passiert gerade richtig viel, besonders innerhalb der asiatisch-amerikanischen Community. Ich glaube, da findet gerade so ein Erkennen statt, was es bedeutet migrantisierte Asiat*innen zu sein und auch mit der Rolle klar zu kommen, die wir für Rassismus und weiße Vorherrschaft spielen. Dazu hatte ich ein ziemlich gutes Gespräch mit Thao. Sie ist Schriftstellerin und Community Organizer, wohnt in Berlin. Ich freue mich, das Gespräch mit euch zu teilen. Also lasst uns reinhören, ja? Thao kannst du dich vorstellen und auch das Kollektiv DAMN*, das du gegründet hast?

 

THAO
Klar. Erstmal, danke, dass ihr mich angesprochen und eingeladen habt hier im International Women* Space Podcast zu sprechen. Mein Name ist Thao und ich bin Autorin und Community Organizer aus Berlin und ich habe 2017 DAMN* gegründet. Der Name steht für “Deutsche Asiat*innen Make Noise”. DAMN* ist eine politische Plattform und ein Aktivist*innen-Kollektiv, das die asiatische Diaspora in Deutschland miteinander verbinden und mobilisieren möchte. Um DAMN* vorzustellen, sollte ich vielleicht erzählen, wie ich… wie ich zum Aktivismus gekommen bin. Meinen ersten Kontakt mit Aktivismus hatte ich tatsächlich während eines Praktikums in einer Schutzeinrichtung für Frauen vor sechs oder sieben Jahren. Da ich eigene Erfahrungen mit sexueller und häuslicher Gewalt habe, habe ich sehr schnell verstanden, dass das System nicht alle gleich unterstützt und dass typischerweise Täter und Unterdrücker geschützt werden. Daher wollte ich unbedingt lernen, wie Frauen sich Hilfe holen und sich selbst schützen können. Ich denke, das hat die Community-Arbeit, die ich mache, sehr stark geprägt, weil es auch da um Selbststudium, Selbstermächtigung (Empowerment) und Selbstorganisation als Selbstschutz geht.

 

NGOC
Danke, das war stark! Ich möchte gerne mehr darüber hören, wie du und DAMN* vorgegangen seid um diesen geschützten und ermächtigenden Raum für Menschen aus der asiatischen Diaspora in Pandemiezeiten zu schaffen.

 

THAO
Die Pandemie hat, glaube ich, zwei Wochen nach Hanau begonnen, ja, nach der Terrorattacke in Hanau. Gerade nach Hanau hatten wir das Bedürfnis uns besser zu organisieren und Arbeitsgruppen zu bilden. Und das erste Treffen war angesetzt für – ich glaube für Anfang März und dann wurde alles zu gemacht und wir wußten nicht, ob wir uns treffen sollen oder nicht. Dann haben haben wir uns dann entschieden uns erstmal nicht offline zu treffen, das Treffen wurde also verschoben und während der Pandemie und dem Lockdown haben wir uns dann entschieden Online-Treffen zu machen. Das war dann tatsächlich ziemlich gut, weil dadurch Menschen, die nicht in Berlin leben, auch teilnehmen konnten. Und das war ziemlich kraftvoll, weil da auch Menschen mit ostasiatischer Herkunft waren, die wegen Corona zum allerersten Mal Rassismus erlebt haben und die gar nicht politisiert waren, sondern einfach einen Raum brauchten, in dem sie darüber sprechen konnten oder wo sie Interesse bekamen politischer oder aktiver zu werden in der Community … oder in Gruppen.

Das Treffen war also… es wurde zu einem Ort von Menschen mit vielen verschieden Hintergründen und bei diesem Treffen haben wir Arbeitsgruppen gebildet und Aufgaben verteilt. Für mich war das so viel ermächtigender (empowernder)…. also der Umstand, dass man Menschen ermächtigt etwas zu tun anstatt, dass man der Mensch ist, der über anti- asiatischen Rassismus spricht, verstehst du? Weil DAMN* war nie etwas, das eine Gruppe oder ein Problem repräsentieren oder die Stimme der asiatischen Diaspora sein wollte. Es war eher ein Raum, in dem Leute zusammenkommen und sich gegenseitig ermächtigen konnten um sich dann ermächtigt zu fühlen etwas zu tun. Es ging nicht nur darum gesehen und gehört zu werden, sondern darum tatsächlich auch zu Handeln.

 

NGOC
Ich möchte noch über die Tatsache sprechen, dass wir während Corona natürlich nicht nur Rassismus gegen asiatische Menschen gesehen haben. Es gab auch Berichte von Rassismus gegen Schwarzen Menschen in asiatischen Ländern. DAMN* hat kürzlich viele Veranstaltungen organisiert. Der Fokus lag einerseits darauf Maßnahmen zu ergreifen um eine Schwarz- Asiatische Solidarität aufzubauen und andererseits darauf einen Raum zu erschaffen, in dem wir reflektieren können, was es für uns bedeutet solidarisch zu sein. Wie hat sich der anti-Schwarze Rassismus innerhalb von asiatischen Communities gezeigt? Und was hast du dir von den Veranstaltungen, die du initiiert hast um den anti-Schwarzen Rassismus zu adressieren, erhofft?

 

THAO
Was mir beim Diskutieren in der DAMN* Gruppen aufgefallen ist, dass manchmal Leute sagen, dass wir über den einfach über den einen Rassismus reden könnten, also dass es egal ist ob wir über Rassismus gegen asiatische Menschen reden oder über Rassismus gegen Schwarze Menschen. Und oft besteht die Auffassung: Ok, wenn wir nur über Rassismus gegen Schwarze Menschen sprechen, dann ignorieren wir unsere Bedürfnisse, weil ich erlebe auch Rassismus. Und warum spricht niemand über Rassismus gegen asiatische Menschen und was ist mit dem Rassismus der Pandemie und der Rassismus der Pandemie richtet sich ja nicht nur gegen Asiat*innen, ja? Das ist etwas, das, denke ich, in den Medien auf starkes Interesse gestoßen ist. Im Verhältnis gab es recht viel Berichterstattung über anti-asiatischen Rassismus in Deutschland und in anderen europäischen Staaten. Wir müssen klar machen, dass diese Probleme Hand in Hand gehen, dass es kein Entweder-Oder gibt… Denn das ist eine ziemlich koloniale Haltung, da sie dich zwingt dich nur auf eine Sache zu konzentrieren… ich meine so funktionieren auch die Medien. Sie berichten über ein Thema und dann ist es das, worauf wir uns jetzt konzentrieren sollen, dann berichten sie über das und dann über dieses und dann jenes, aber so sollte das nicht laufen.

Was ich auch noch sagen will: Wir müssen definitiv über “colorism”, also die Diskriminierung aufgrund des Hauttons, in unseren asiatischen Communities sprechen. Das ist etwas ganz Zentrales. Zb hier in Berlin ein paar asiatische Kollektive, aber der Schwerpunkt liegt meisten auf ostasiatischen oder südostasiatischen Kollektiven. Um über anti-Schwarzen Rassismus in unseren asiatischen Communities zu sprechen, müssen wir daher unseren eigenen anti-Schwarzen Rassismus entlarven. Und auch wie wir arbeiten – es reicht nicht über diese Themen zu sprechen und dann nicht zu handeln. Wir können Tausende Workshops unter dem Titel “Lasst uns über colorism sprechen” veranstalten, oder? Wir können sogar jemanden aus Südasien einladen und über Colorism sprechen lassen doch. Es reicht nicht. Ich muss wahrnehmen, dass auch in unseren asiatischen Communities Menschen als Tokens benutzt werden und das ist echt problematisch. Dh wir müssen daran und an vielen anderen Dingen arbeiten.

 

NGOC
Wie stellst du dir eine Schwarz-Asiatische Solidarität vor und wie können wir darauf hinarbeiten?

 

THAO
Für mich ist DAMN* immer praxisorientiert gewesen, weil… ich war früher in weißen, linken Gruppen aktiv und dort gab es meisten viel Theorie und wenig Handeln, viele große Konzepte und wenig Konkretes. Deswegen versuchen wir von DAMN* uns auf Konkretes zu fokussieren. Wenn wir uns also darauf fokussieren Schwarz- asiatische Solidarität aufzubauen, dann bedeutet das auch, dass wir unsere Communities über die Eigenschaften von anti-Schwarzen Rassismus, repressive Systeme und Kapitalismus aufklären und ihnen bewusst machen, was Individuen tun können. Kapitalismus, weiße Vorherrschaft, Patriarchat, Homophobie, all das müssen wir aufschlüsseln und anfangen zu verstehen, was es eigentlich heißt. Weil wenn du nicht weißt, was es heißt und trotzdem versuchst ein*e Verbündete*r zu sein, dann ist das nur Show, weil du deine eigene Position in der Gesellschaft und deine Privilegien nicht kennst.

Wir sprechen zwar viel über Privilegien, aber wir sprechen nicht oft darüber, was wir mit ihnen machen können und wie wir einander mit unseren Ressourcen helfen können. Schaut mal das Konzept der Vorbild- Minderheit hinein. Ich denke, das ist ein ganz großes Thema, das uns daran hindert Solidarität zu zeigen. Gerade weil es die Vorstellung gibt, dass Asiatische Menschen von der weißen Vorherrschaft profitieren, insbesondere Asiat*innen, Ostasiat*innen und Vietnames*innen gelten als die Vorbildminderheit, als Migrationswunder, als was auch immer, daher ist es definitiv wichtig über das Konzept der Vorbild-Minderheit in Verbindung mit anderen Konzepten wie z. B dem Kapitalismus zu sprechen. Und darüber wie sie zusammenhängen. Es ist wichtig zuerst innerhalb unserer Communities zu schauen, bevor wir behaupten Verbündete zu sein oder sonst irgendwas. Für mich bedeutet ein*e Verbündete*r zu sein, mir all dieser Strukturen bewusst zu werden und festzustellen: Ja, wir kämpfen denselben Kampf und wir sind hier um einander zu unterstützen.

 

NGOC
Danke, dass du deine Gedanken mit uns geteilt hast!

 

[IWS RADIO JINGLE]

 

DAHYE
Danke, Thao für deinen Input und die tolle Arbeit, die du machst! Ich hoffe, viele Hörer*innen unterstützen die wichtigen Aktionen von DAMN*!

Jetzt werden wir einen Song von einem Projekt von DJ Jee, Tsukasa Yajima and Suna Lim hören. Er heißt “my little peace statue” (meine kleine Friedensstatue). Die Friedensstatue wurde gebaut um an die Geschichte der Frauen, zu erinnern, die während des zweiten Weltkrieges vom japanischen Militär zur Zwangsprostitution genötigt wurden. Sie wurden auch “Trostfrauen” genannt. Die Statue ist ein Zeichen: Das soll nie wieder passiert. Solche Statuen stehen an vielen Orten, aber es gibt sie auch im Kleinformat zum Kaufen, damit wir sie herumtragen oder auf unsere Tische stellen können. Das Team hat einen Film gemacht mit Aufnahmen von den kleinen Friedensstatuen, wie sie durch Berlin reisen und von vielen Menschen geliebt werden.

AG Trostfrauen vom Korea Verband organisiert viele Aktionen, Bildungsangebote und Forschung zum Thema “Trostfrauen”. Im Moment gibt es eine Dauerausstellung unter dem Namen “Trostfrauen und unser gemeinsamer Kampf gegen sexualisierte Gewalt” in ihrem Büro in Moabit. Die Ausstellung verknüpft strukturelle, sexuelle Gewalte in verschiedenen Regionen und gibt Besucher*innen die Möglichkeit bei zukünftigen Aktionen mitzumachen. Für weitere Informationen besucht ihre Webseite oder schickt eine Email an mail@koreaverband.de um bei ihrer Arbeit mitzumachen oder um die Ausstellung zu besuchen. Zurück zum Projekt “Meine kleine Friedensstatue”. Im Song kommen die Namen Opfer des “Trostfrauen”- System vor, aus aller Welt, mit unterschiedlichen Stimmen. Wir wollen die Namen derjenigen aussprechen (#SayTheirNames), die Opfer von sexualisierter Gewalt, strukturellem Rassismus und Polizeigewalt geworden sind.

 

[SONG: MY LITTLE PEACE STATUE ]

 

HEAWON
Hallo nochmal, wir sind wieder da. Wir hatten ein tolles Gespräch heute! Dahye, wo können Hörer*innen, die jetzt Lust bekommen sich zu involvieren, noch mehr lernen?

 

DAHYE
Es gibt das #Mygration Festival Deutschland, das viele Veranstaltungen macht, bei denen Menschen mit migrantischen Bezügen ihre Geschichten auf ihre eigene Art und Weise teilen. International Women* Space ist ein Kooperationspartner des Festival. Wegen der aktuellen Situation kann das Festival diese Jahr nicht leibhaftig stattfinden, aber es gibt das ganze Jahr über unterschiedliche Online Angebote. Un.Thai.tled is ein tolles Kollektive von Kreativen aus Berlin. Sie organisieren Veranstaltungen, bei denen sie Talente aus Thailand und Deutschland frei von billigen Labels und Stereotypen vorstellen und so das Narrativ zurück in die Hände der betroffenen Personen legen.

 

HEAWON
Ja. Wir sind nun am Ende der Sendung angelangt. Danke an Esra Nayeon Karakaya, Jiye Seong-Yu, and Thao, dafür, dass ihr euer Wissen und eure Perspektiven mit uns und den Hörer*innen geteilt habt.

 

DAHYE
Danke Woo! Yeah! Vielen Dank an Alle! Wir freuen uns auch weiterhin mit euch bei IWS Radio im Austausch zu sein. Bitte teilt den Podcast mit euren Freund*innen, Familie und Genoss*innen! [Übersetzung comrades]

 

[IWS RADIO OUTRO]